Saturday, November 28, 2009

Announcements: November 28-29

Parish Celebration of Year of the Priest & Farewell for Fr. Clement Lim
Date: 12/12/2009 (Saturday)
Time: 5.45 pm
(Followed by Fellowship)


Congratulations on Appointment and Farewell to Fr. Clement Lim
Fr. Clement Lim will be leaving us to take up residence in the Church of Immaculate Conception, Port Dickson, as Parish Priest from 26th December 2009. We wish him all the best and thank him for his tireless and dedicated service to our Parish. We will miss him.


Next Infant Baptism on 6th December
Instruction for parents/godparents will be on 5th December (Saturday) at 7.30 pm in the Classroom
Baptism forms are to be submitted by 3/12/2009


Christmas Campaign for the Poor 2009

The Christmas Campaign Committee is organising a flea market and food sale on 28th & 29th November 2009.
Kindly patronize their stalls.


Gotong Royong on 18th December (Friday)
(Public Holiday) from 8.30 am by the Sunday School students (others are most welcomed to come forward to help out in cleaning our Church and the premises in time for Christmas)


Confession for the Home-Bound, Elderly and Sick
Please inform the office latest by 6th December 2009


P.I.H.D Committee Meeting
Date: 11/12/09 Friday
Time: 7 pm
Venue: Recreation Corner


SSVP Christmas Cards for 2009 are sold out
Previous years Christmas cards are still available at RM5.00 per pack


Christmas Presentation
(Sunday School Students)

Date: 13th December, 2009 (Sunday)
Venue: Visitation Hall (Downstairs)
Time: 2.00 pm - 5.00 pm


Holy Hour
There will be no Holy Hour on 3/12/2009 as the priests will be away to assist in the KL Archdiocese Penitential Services for Advent.


Sunday School Year-End Programme
The final catechism classes for the year will be on the 22/1/09 (Sunday). Classes will be dismissed at 12 noon due to the Parish Pastoral Assembly. Registration for 2010 will be held on 3/1/2010.


Catechetical Youth Camp for Secondary Students
(Forms 1-4)
Date: 10th December 2009 (Thursday)
Time: 8.30 am - 5.00 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall (downstairs)


Confirmation Class Programme
1. Study Day in preparation of Confirmation Camp
Dates: 1 & 2 December, 2009
Time: 8.30 am to 4.30 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall Upstairs
2. Confirmation Camp
Dates: 4-6 December 2009
Facilitators: Martin Jalleh & Fr. George
Venue: Church of Visitation
3. Community Service on 18/12/09

Penitential Service for Advent
16th December 2009
Venue: Church of Visitation
Time: 7.00 - 9.30 pm
(Come and celebrate God's forgiveness in preparation for Christmas)



Misa dalam Bahasa Malaysia
akan dirayakan pada 29hb November (Ahad) jam 12 tengahari


Meeting of Catechists
Date: 29-11-09 (Sunday)
Time: 10.30 am - 1.00 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall - Upstairs



The Advent Wreath Candles

"Customarily the Advent Wreath is constructed of a circle of evergreen branches into which are inserted four candles. According to tradition, three of the candles are violet and the fourth is rose. However, four violet or white candles may also be used” (Book of Blessings 1510).

The rose candle is lit the third Sunday of Advent, for this color anticipates and symbolizes the Christmas joy announced in the first word of the Entrance Antiphon: "Rejoice" (Latin, Gaudete). For this reason the Third Sunday is also called Gaudete Sunday, and rose color vestments are permitted.

The Advent Wreath represents the long time when people lived in spiritual darkness, waiting for the coming of the Messiah, the Light of the world. Each year in Advent people wait once again in darkness for the coming of the Lord, His historical coming in the mystery of Bethlehem, His final coming at the end of time, and His special coming in every moment of grace.

During Advent, family and friends can gather around the Advent Wreath lighting the appropriate candle(s), read from the daily Advent meditation and sing songs.

Here's a video that explains the origins of the Advent wreath and candles.

Friday, November 27, 2009

The Season of Advent: Season of Anticipation and Hope


Advent is the beginning of the Church's Liturgical Calendar Year. It begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas Day, which is the Sunday nearest November 30 (The Feast of St. Andrew, the Apostle), and ends on Christmas Eve (Dec 24). If Christmas Eve is a Sunday, it is counted as the fourth Sunday of Advent, with Christmas Eve proper beginning at sundown.

This year, Advent begins at sundown on November 28 (which coincides with the second day of the Islamic Feast of Aidil Adha).

The word Advent means "coming" or "arrival." The focus of the entire season is the celebration of the birth of Jesus the Christ in his First Advent, and the anticipation of the return of Christ the King in his Second Advent. Thus, Advent is far more than simply marking a 2,000 year old event in history. It is celebrating a truth about God, the revelation of God in Christ whereby all of creation might be reconciled to God. That is a process in which we now participate, and the consummation of which we anticipate. Scripture reading for Advent will reflect this emphasis on the Second Advent, including themes of accountability for faithfulness at His coming, judgment on sin, and the hope of eternal life.

In this double focus on past and future, Advent also symbolizes the spiritual journey of individuals and a congregation, as they affirm that Christ has come, that He is present in the world today, and that He will come again in power. That acknowledgment provides a basis for Kingdom ethics, for holy living arising from a profound sense that we live "between the times" and are called to be faithful stewards of what is entrusted to us as God’s people. So, as the church celebrates God’s inbreaking into history in the Incarnation, and anticipates a future consummation to that history for which "all creation is groaning awaiting its redemption," it also confesses its own responsibility as a people commissioned to "love the Lord your God with all your heart" and to "love your neighbor as yourself."

The Colors of Advent

Historically, the primary sanctuary color of Advent is Purple. This is the color of penitence and fasting as well as the color of royalty to welcome the Advent of the King. The purple of Advent is also the color of suffering used during Lent and Holy Week. This points to an important connection between Jesus’ birth and death. The nativity, the Incarnation, cannot be separated from the crucifixion. The purpose of Jesus’ coming into the world, of the "Word made flesh" and dwelling among us, is to reveal God and His grace to the world through Jesus’ life and teaching, but also through his suffering, death, and resurrection. To reflect this emphasis, originally Advent was a time of penitence and fasting, much as the Season of Lent and so shared the color of Lent.

In the four weeks of Advent the third Sunday came to be a time of rejoicing that the fasting was almost over (in some traditions it is called Gaudete Sunday, from the Latin word for "rejoice"). The shift from the purple of the Season to pink or rose for the third Sunday Advent candles reflected this lessening emphasis on penitence as attention turned more to celebration of the season.

The Spirit of Advent

Advent is marked by a spirit of expectation, of anticipation, of preparation, of longing. There is a yearning for deliverance from the evils of the world, first expressed by Israelite slaves in Egypt as they cried out from their bitter oppression. It is the cry of those who have experienced the tyranny of injustice in a world under the curse of sin, and yet who have hope of deliverance by a God who has heard the cries of oppressed slaves and brought deliverance!

It is that hope, however faint at times, and that God, however distant He sometimes seems, which brings to the world the anticipation of a King who will rule with truth and justice and righteousness over His people and in His creation. It is that hope that once anticipated, and now anticipates anew, the reign of an Anointed One, a Messiah, who will bring peace and justice and righteousness to the world.

Part of the expectation also anticipates a judgment on sin and a calling of the world to accountability before God. We long for God to come and set the world right! Yet, as the prophet Amos warned, the expectation of a coming judgment at the "Day of the Lord" may not be the day of light that we might want, because the penetrating light of God’s judgment on sin will shine just as brightly on God’s people.

So, we celebrate with gladness the great promise in the Advent, yet knowing that there is also a somber tone as the theme of threat is added to the theme of promise. This is reflected in some of the Scripture readings for Advent, in which there is a strong prophetic tone of accountability and judgment on sin. But this is also faithful to the role of the Coming King who comes to rule, save, and judge the world.

Because of the dual themes of threat and promise, Advent is a time of preparation that is marked by prayer. While Lent is characterized by fasting and a spirit of penitence, Advent’s prayers are prayers of humble devotion and commitment, prayers of submission, prayers for deliverance, prayers from those walking in darkness who are awaiting and anticipating a great light (Isa 9)!

The spirit of Advent is expressed well in the parable of the bridesmaids who are anxiously awaiting the coming of the Bridegroom (Matt 25:1-13). There is profound joy at the Bridegroom’s expected coming. And yet a warning of the need for preparation echoes through the parable. But even then, the prayer of Advent is still:

Come, O Come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel!

世界末日了! 你们要当心,要醒悟!

将临期第一主日

今天教会开始新的礼仪年。 在许多的文化及传统中,我们常发现所举行的新年庆典多为纪念并感谢上天整年来的眷顾。而最重要的是为来年祈福。我们基督徒却有稍微不同方式庆祝我们的礼仪年。我们不回顾过去也不展望未来但把焦点放在末日――世界末日。这看来非常不可思议尤其是当我们认为末日是恐怖的。

今天福音的第一端就呈现了一副世界末日可怕的画面――“在日月星辰上将有异兆出现;在地上万国要因海洋波涛的怒号而惊惶失措。众人要因恐惧,等待即将临于天下的事而昏厥,因为诸天的万象将要动摇。”天灾如地震,海啸,台风,水灾等等,常带来恐惧忧虑。在另一方面,科学告诉我们这一些天灾是地球的演变与形成而造成的。它是生命而不是死亡的象征。行星却没有这些天灾――没有地震,没有风暴,没有火山――也没有生命。什么也不能在这样的行星中生存。它们都是死的行星。

为此,耶稣常引用这些天灾来形容世界末日为了显示新的将产生。这一切都是生命的涌现。这一切不是死亡反而是生命的象征。如果我们以这样的观点看待世界末日,那今天所庆祝的以及这将临期将成为希望而不是恐惧的庆典了。

我们不应该问的问题是:“这一切什么时候发生?什么时候和怎样发生不重要。我们该问的问题是:在等待这末日期间,我们该做什么呢?今天的读经满含这方面的训导。

首先,虽然有许多的困惑,事情并不顺意,没有人该气馁。耶稣告诉我们说:“这些事开始发生时,你们应当挺起身来,抬起你们的头,因为你们的救援近了。”我们不该忧虑因耶稣要来。这是肯定的。他是我们的救主。今天我们面对许多问题――家庭问题,经济问题。许多人想放弃。耶稣提醒我们――不要丧志――应当挺起身来,抬起你们的头,因为你们的救援近了。

第二,当面对障碍及在世界中的许多邪恶,我们常受到诱惑逃避或找借口或假造解决办法。有些人转而酗酒,有的纵欲为得到满足。耶稣提醒我们说:“你们应当谨慎,免得你们的心为宴饮沉醉,及人生的挂虑所累时,那意想不到的日子有如罗网临到你们身上。”请记住,没有人能逃过审判。每一个人都必须为自己的行为负责。耶稣保证“那日子降临到全地面的一切君民身上。”

第三,我们应当时时醒悟祈祷。这并不是指我们必须二十四小时躲在圣堂。反而,真正的祈祷使我们更接近天主及他人。藉着祈祷,天主使我们与他和其他的人亲近。藉着祈祷,上主将加深我们的爱德使我们彼此相爱及爱着天下的人正如圣保禄在读经二中所写的。醒悟指的是我们应该严肃看待我们的灵修成长。如果我们的信德仍留在小学学生的阶段,我们就还没准备好与天主面对面相对。圣保禄敦促我们每一个人继续在我们的灵修生活中成长。

Thursday, November 26, 2009

The End is Near! What shall we do?!

First Sunday of Advent Year C

Today the Church begins a new liturgical year. In many cultures and traditions, we often find their new year celebration as an opportunity to remember and give thanks to God for all the blessings of the past year. More importantly it is a time to pray for a good year ahead. We Christians have a slightly different way of celebrating our liturgical new year. We celebrate this event not by looking to the past or to the following year but we are asked to focus on the end of time – the end of the world. This may seem extremely strange especially when we often regard the end of the world as something frightening.

The first part of today’s gospel does present a frightening picture of the end of the world – “There will be signs in the sun and moon and stars; on earth nations in agony, bewildered by the clamour of the ocean and its waves; men dying of fear as they await what menaces the world, for the powers of heaven will be shaken.” Natural calamities, like earthquakes, tsunami, typhoon, floods etc. often bring about this experience of fear and anxiety. On the other hand, science tells us that these natural calamities are the result of an earth which is growing and evolving. It is signs of life rather than of death. Planets that no longer have such natural calamities – no earthquakes, no storms, no volcanoes – also have no life. Nothing can live on such planets. They are dead planets.

So, Jesus very often uses the image of natural calamities to describe the end of the world in order to show that something new is about to be born. These are birth pangs. These are not signs of death but rather of life. If we begin to view the end of the world in this perspective, then today’s celebration and this season of Advent will become a celebration of hope rather than a celebration of fear.

We should not ask the question: “When will all of these happen?” When and how is not important. The question that we should be asking is this: What shall we do as we await this final day. Today’s scriptures are full of lessons for us.

First of all, even if there is a lot of confusion, things are not going according to our plans, nobody should lose heart. Jesus tells us: “When these things begin to take place, stand erect, hold your heads high, because your liberation is near at hand.” We must not be anxious because Jesus is coming. This is certain. He is our saviour. Today, we face many problems – family problems, financial problems. Many feel like giving up. Jesus reminds us – do not lose heart – stand erect and hold your heads high because your liberation is near at hand.

Secondly, when faced with obstacles and so much evil in the world, we are often tempted to run away or to look for excuses or fake solutions. Some people turn to alcohol while others to sex in order to find some satisfaction. Jesus reminds us: “Watch yourselves, or your hearts will be coarsened with debauchery and drunkenness and the cares of life, and that day will be sprung on you suddenly, like a trap.” Remember that no one can escape judgment. Everyone will be asked to give an account of their action. Jesus assures us of this: “For it will come down on every living man on the face of the earth.”

Thirdly, we must “stay awake and pray”. This does not mean that we should be hiding in the church 24 hours a day. On the contrary, true prayer leads us closer to God and to others. Through prayer, the Lord will increase our love and make us love one another and the whole human race as St. Paul writes in the second reading. Staying awake means that we must take our spiritual development seriously. If our faith is still at the level of a primary school child, we will not be ready when the time comes for us to meet God face to face. St. Paul urges each and every one of us to continue growing in our faith life.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

The Liturgical Year

As we come to the end of the liturgical year and prepare to begin a new year with the First Sunday of Advent (November 29), it would be good to reflect on the significance of the liturgical year.

Singapore Landings Team Visits Seremban


A small delegation of the Landing Team from the Church of Holy Spirit, Singapore, led by Fr. Andrew Wong, visited the Church of Visitation, Seremban this afternoon. The Singapore team had an informal discussion over lunch with Fr. Michael Chua, Fr. Clement Lim, Mr. John Lim (PPC Chairman) and Mr. Benedict Chan (PFC Chairman)over the possibilities of expanding the Landings programme in Seremban and both parishes explored opportunities for future mutual cooperation.

Landings reaches out to inactive Catholics and empowers laity to welcome them home. In parishes, groups of six to eight active Catholics join together with two or three who are returning. Over the course of 10 weeks, group members listen to one another tell their faith stories. The course then culminates in a retreat where the Sacrament of Penance/ Reconciliation is celebrated. The key to Landings is compassionate listening. And more than just words, Landings offers the example of lived faith.

The Church of Visitation ran its inaugural Landings course which started in May this year. Participants have shared how they have experienced healing through the compassionate listening of fellow pilgrims.

Landings IS:

  • A safe harbor or landing place for returning Catholics to explore their faith and future with the Church.
  • A group of six to eight active Catolics joined together to welcome two or three returning Catholics to share and explore faith together.
  • People in solidarity with the returning, who in their own lives have "returned," and continue to "return."
  • Founded on the belief that we do not have to be trained theologians to share what we believe, and to speak honestly about our faith, trusting in the Holy Spirit.

Negeri Sembilan District Altar Servers Camp 2009


Over 120 altar servers from the various churches and chapels within the Negeri Sembilan District gathered at the Catholic Centre, Seremban, for their camp. The camp started on Sunday, November 22, evening, with a video presentation on the life and ministry of St. John Vianney with a sharing by Fr. Clement Lim.

The following morning, Fr. Mari Arokiam from the Church of St. John Vianney, Tampin, celebrated mass with the boys. The first session of the morning was given by Fr. Michael Chua who spoke on the Gift of Serving. He used the story of Jesus healing the paralytic in Luke 5:17-26 and drew a distinction between the four friends who helped the paralytic enter into the presence of Jesus and the scribes and Pharisees who tried to exclude him.

The camp also saw many group dynamic activities, group sharing, praise and worship, drama presentation of biblical stories, and games animated by the senior altar servers of the Church of Visitation. The camp concludedtoday with a session by Fr. George Packiasamy who shared his vocation story. This was followed with a question and answer sessions with the district clergy. Many of the participants expressed their gratitude for new learning experiences and opportunity to make new friends. Some mentioned that they had learned teamwork and patience during the course of this event. Fr. Mari concluded by reminding the altar servers that their service is part of their calling, a "calling for interaction towards growth and integration."



Monday, November 23, 2009

Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009, 3/3

Theme for 2010: “The Bible, A Guide for our Steps, A Light for the World”

Focus: To make the Bible, the Word of God the centre of our lives, and the basis of:
  1. Community and Unity
  2. Discipleship
  3. Prayer
  4. Service
  5. Witnessing

Method:
a) ACTM focus on training and introducing leaders to Lectio Divina (Spiritual Reading).
b) To provide modules for Lectio Divina based on Lectionary Readings
c) Formations on Bible (including 100 Weeks Bible, 44 week Bible Course etc.)
d) Formations on Evangelisation/ Witnessing/ Discipleship/ Spirituality
e) Retreat on Lectio Divina
f) Catechetical Emphasis on Bible
g) Ensure that every family or member should have a bible (cheap Bibles or sponsored bibles to be made available to poorer families; audio CDs for those who are illiterate)

B. Pastoral Priorities for 2010

Proposed Pastoral Priorities for 2010
a) Strengthening BECs - deepening spirituality of members and the community
b) Family Life – deepening prayer and faith life, empowering them to be witnesses to each other and their children
c) Youth – deepening spirituality and faith in order to face challenges posed by studies, work, relationships and the world.
d) Integral Human Development – to enable all Catholics to recognise that this is an essential part of their mission.
e) Discipleship formation – emphasis on Spirituality/Discipleship and Evangelisation – to help people move from mere maintenance (caring for members only) to mission (witnessing and reaching out to others)


C. Parish Events for 2010

Proposed Parish Events for 2010
a) IHD Lenten Formation – 26th February 2010
b) Regular Family Life Formations (ongoing)
c) Parish Level Formation on Bible, Prayer, Spirituality, Evangelisation (ongoing)
d) Parish Feast Day Triduum – 27th - 29th May 2010
e) Parish Retreat – 10th - 11th July 2010
f) Parish Pastoral Assembly – 14th November 2010

Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009, 2/3

Keynote Address for Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009
By Fr. Michael Chua

A warm welcome to all of you who have made time to come for this assembly. We, the priests and the Pastoral Council members, are grateful to you for your unwavering support and commitment to the pastoral plan of our parish. As in the past, I would like to share a few thoughts with you which I hope will help you to evaluate the pastoral direction of our parish in order to plan for the future.

In helping our people and BECs to reflect on this year’s theme, “It’s Good to Be in Small Groups,” we have highlighted certain essential key indicators of growth throughout the course of the year: in our ACTM Formation, BEC reflection modules, Zone Visits, Parish Feast Day/ Triduum, Parish Retreat, and Parish Inter-zone BEC Games. These growth indicators, as you are aware are based on the model of the early Christian Community in Acts 2:42-47: fellowship, discipleship, prayer, ministry, and witnessing.

These days we have heard a lot of what isn’t working and how Catholics are indifferent to both community and ministry. The recent survey indicates that our BECs and perhaps the parish and its members have often been emphasizing one dimension of growth to the detriment of others.

There is an urgent need to revisit the early Christian community to find an answer to our predicament. The mission of the early church can be understood in terms of two fundamental polarities -- each of which existed in tension with the other; building communities and making disciples. In the past and now, these two polarities preserve and serve to fulfill one another -- one is internally oriented and the other externally. Peter and Paul best represents these two polarities. Paul represents mission, an external focus of the Church on making disciples. Peter, by contrast can be said to represent community, an internal focus of the Church on meeting the needs of the faithful.

Although these polarities are in tension, both were and are necessary to a vital Church. Over the past decades, our parish may have lost our emphasis on mission, concentrating instead on just meeting the daily needs of members. Without mission, community in our church has come to mean little more than maintenance of the status quo. Without mission, the Church is impoverished and will even begin to die.

In order to regain this balance and to return to the roots of our identity and mission, we all need to make a shift: moving from maintenance to mission; from inward looking to outward looking; from activities to spirituality; from mere participation to genuine discipleship, this will ultimately breathe new life into our faith communities.

Mission is never just a human endeavour. It is living out the great commission of Christ. It means returning to the gospel of Jesus Christ and making it the soul and core of our lives. Next year, our parish moves into the second stage of New Image of the Parish (NIP) and also its fourth year. The focus for the year would be the Bible.

The Parish Pastoral Council has chosen the theme, “The Bible, A Guide for our Steps, A Light for the World.” As a focus, we want to make the Bible, the Word of God the centre of our lives, and the basis of mission: building Community and Unity, Discipleship, Prayer, Service, and Witnessing. Throughout the year, we will help parishioners to own and realize this theme by providing them with a simple method of reading and praying the bible, Lectio Divina (Spiritual Reading). We hope that by the end of the year every family or member should have a bible and make bible reading a regular feature of their daily lives. Conversion and change will follow when one is touched by God’s Word.

May the Word of God be a “lamp for our feet and light for our path.” (Psa 119:105)

Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009, 1/3

The Parish Pastoral Assembly of the Church of Visitation 2009, which was held yesterday November 22, was well attended by 270 over participants from the four language groups. The participants were briefed on the report of the last Pastoral Parish Survey for 2009 and the Parish Pastoral Planning for the year 2010. There was also substantial time given for answering queries from parishioners regarding the pastoral direction of the parish. Archbishop Murphy Pakiam delivered the closing address.

Below are some photographs taken during the assembly. (More photos can be viewed on Facebook)









Saturday, November 21, 2009

你期待得到证书吗?

基督普世君王节

在一项课程结束后,我们通常会得到一份证书证明我们已完成这项课程。这份证书有时也包括我们的表现记录。举个例子,在学校的学业结束后,我们获得一份证书显示我们考试的成绩。今天是教会礼仪年的最后一天。也许我们将期待某一种的证书来证明我们曾按照教会所教导而生活。如果我们表现得不好,如果我们感觉我们并不是好教徒,我们也许对这份证书有点难为情。

很抱歉我得使你们失望因为天主的价值观不同于世俗的价值观。耶稣在今天的福音中提醒我们这一点。在回答比拉多有关他是否是犹太人的君王的问题时,耶稣回答说:“我的国不属于这个世界。”而耶稣的确是君王,虽不同类形。他答说:“你说的是,我是君王。我为此而生,我也为此而来到世界上,为给真理作证:凡属于真理的,必听从我的声音。”

假设说,如果我们要从耶稣那里取得证书,对耶稣和天主来说什么是重要的呢?证书并不将是我们成功的记录――我们所做的这,或那,有多好。主要的并不是成就而是忠信――我们对主忠信吗?我们有忠于耶稣要我们成为他的门徒的召唤吗?我们有忠于耶稣所教导的一切吗?

第二,证书并不关注我们的身份与地位。权势与地位在天主的国里是不能立足的。主要的只是事奉。耶稣是君王但不是专横跋扈的君王。他是仆役君王。我们有为我们的弟兄姐妹尤其是那些弱小贫穷的弟兄姐妹效劳吗?我们有为他们付出我们的时间和帮助并不指望任何的酬报吗?

第三,证书也不记录我们祈祷,参与弥撒或培训课程的次数。这些固然重要;但更重要的是我们生命应有所转变。在我们回顾这整年来,我们是否有所改变呢?我们是否变得更积极呢?我们是否能够克服某方面在这之前曾挣扎的罪过呢?

今天,在我们庆祝基督普世君王节的当儿,让我们以读经二默示录中的句子回应:“忠实的见证,死者中的前生者,和地上万王的元首耶稣基督,愿光荣与全能归于那爱我们,并以自己的血解救我们脱离我们的罪过,使我们成为国度,成为侍奉他的天主和司祭的那位,直到万世万代。”让我们允许基督做我们生命的君王和主好成为他的见证人。

Friday, November 20, 2009

What is the Parish Pastoral Assembly?


What is the Parish Pastoral Assembly?

  • It is not an AGM
  • It’s not about long reports, motions and elections.
  • It is a forum that seeks to deepen our sense of our shared care and responsibility for our parish/ our faith community


It is a FORUM to LISTEN to ...
  • The whole parish in the form of the data tabulated from the survey
  • Others in small workshops and open forums.
  • You and what you feel is important for this parish.
  • Our priests and leaders as they try to discern God’s directions for this parish


It is a FORUM to SHARE ...
  • Your DREAMS and VISIONS for this parish.
  • Your joys and sorrows in being a part of this parish
  • Your reflections on the manner in which God is leading this parish.
  • Your ideas and suggestions for the future planning of this parish.


You will come to know and be able to seek clarification regarding the pastoral plan of this church
“New Image of the Parish”


When is it taking place this year?
November 22, Sunday, 2.00 to 6.00 pm

Announcements: November 21-22

Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009
22nd November 2009
Venue: Visitation Hall
Time: 1:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Compulsory for all BEC Core Team Members, Ministry Committee members. All other parishioners are invited to attend.
Registration after all masses this weekend



Christmas Campaign for the Poor 2009

The Christmas Campaign Committee is organising a flea market and food sale on 28th & 29th November 2009.
They are also appealing for contributions of useable items. They will be at the recreation corner on 29th November (Sunday) to collect these items.
Contact person: Jerome (012-3308071)


Christmas Presentation
Date: 13th December, 2009 (Sunday)
Venue: Visitation Hall (Downstairs)
Time: 2.00 pm - 5.00 pm


Holy Childhood Collection
All cans and envelopes should be returned to the Sunday School Office on 22/11/09 since the collection is to be forwarded to the Archdiocese by 30/11/09


Sunday School Year-End Programme
The final catechism classes for the year will be on the 22/1/09 (Sunday). Classes will be dismissed at 12 noon due to the Parish Pastoral Assembly. Registration for 2010 will be held on 3/1/2010.


Confirmation Class Programme
1. Study Day in preparation of Confirmation Camp
Dates: 1 & 2 December, 2009
Time: 8.30 am to 4.30 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall Upstairs
2. Confirmation Camp
Dates: 4-6 December 2009
Facilitators: Martin Jalleh & Fr. George
Venue: Church of Visitation
3. Community Service on 18/12/09

Penitential Service for Advent
16th December 2009
Venue: Church of Visitation
Time: 7.00 - 9.30 pm
(Come and celebrate God's forgiveness in preparation for Christmas)



Migran/ Pendatang Refugi/ Umat dari Sabah-Sarawak
Kita berharap untuk memulihkan pelayanan kepada kumpulan ini. Sila segera berdaftar dengan En. Alfred (Tel No. 016-2129404) selepas Misa.


Misa dalam Bahasa Malaysia
akan dirayakan pada 29hb November (Ahad) jam 12 tengahari


RCIA: Day of Recollection in preparation for Catechumenate
Date: 21- 11-2009 (English)
Time: 1.20 pm to 5.00 pm
Place: Visitation Hall - upstairs
All Candidates and sponsors are to be present.

Please pray for the enquirers and sponsors for a fruitful recollection

Rite of Acceptance into the Order of Catechumens (English)
1st Sunday of Advent
English session on 28th November 2009 (Saturday sunset)
All Candidates and sponsors are to be present



Meeting of Catechists
Date: 29-11-09 (Sunday)
Time: 10.30 am - 1.00 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall - Upstairs



SDVP Calendars at RM10.00 and Christmas Cards at RM6.00 (pack of 8 assorted cards)are on sale now.
Kindly give your support.



Book Mission on 21st and 22nd November 2009
The Daughters of St. Paul will be having a display and sale of books after all Masses on the above dates. May this mission help to deepen our faith in God and cultivate the culture of reading among our Catholic faithful. Kindly patronise their stall.


"Exodus" Formation for Migrants and Refugees Collaborators
(especially for pastoral workers and collaborators involved in the care of migrants and refugees)

Date: Dec 3- 6
Venue: Majodi Centre, Johore
Closing Date: 22/11/2009
Please register with the Parish Office


District Altar Servers Camp
22nd to 24th November 2009
(3 Language Groups)
Venue: Catholic Centre
All Altar servers to register their attendance between 6 pm to 7 pm on Sunday, 22nd November at the Catholic Centre, Jalan Lee Sam.


Lay People need Religious to inspire them

HUA HIN, Thailand (UCAN) -- Men and women Religious are needed in Asia today to inspire laypeople and be a powerful a sign of God's presence in their economically driven societies.

This was the message a lay Church worker gave to leading Asian Religious gathered for a Federation of Asian Bishops' (FABC) meeting in Hua Hin, Thailand.

Religious must live the consecrated life not only for themselves but as an inspiration for laypeople, who face the pressures of modern living, Sherman Kuek told some 60 nuns, brothers, priests and bishops at the Nov. 16-21 FABC symposium. The meeting had the theme, "The Impact of Today's Culture on the Church, especially as regards Consecrated Life in Asia Today."

Kuek, 33, is director of the Melaka-Johor Diocesan Pastoral Institute in Malaysia and was the only lay speaker at the symposium. Religious must live radical antithetical lives that inspire and excite laypeople to emulate them, albeit in their lay state of life, he said.

He noted that laypeople live in a culture that urges them to "work more, earn more, spend more," and which is "at odds with the Gospel."

He said that laypeople have inevitably reinterpreted, redefined and compartmentalized religion. From being at the center of their lives, it is now relegated to a corner. They faithfully perform religious duties and obligations but otherwise they are busy engaging with a culture that advocates consumption and the acquiring of wealth.

In modern Asian societies such as Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan, laypeople "choose both God and mammon," Kuek asserted.

Now the Church in Asia is challenged to answer a prophetic call to authentic discipleship, Kuek continued, explaining that this call is for Religious to make a stand for the sake of the laity.

"The Church can shout and shout" in condemning materialism and urging charity but laypeople do not necessarily listen because they have to survive in the modern world, he stressed.

Many Religious said on the sidelines that his call to them was a powerful challenge.

Filipina Sister Julma Neo noted that after Vatican Council II, many Religious not only "adapted" to the world, as was intended, but also "adopted" the ways of the world.

The former general councilor for Asia of the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul agreed that for the consecrated life to make sense, it must be mystical, prophetic and counter-cultural.

(Published in UCAN News, November 19)
Dr. Sherman Kuek was Pastoral Associate of Formation and Youth Ministry in the Church of Visitation, Seremban and Chapel of St. Theresa, Nilai from 2008-2009. He now serves as Director of the Pastoral Institute of the Melaka-Johor Diocese.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Don't expect a Certificate!

Christ the King Year B

At the end of a course, we usually expect a certificate to proof that we have completed the course. The certificate would also sometimes include a record of our performance. For example, at the end of our studies in school, we get a certificate to show the grades we received in our final exam. Today is the last day of the Church’s liturgical year. Perhaps, we would also be expecting some form of certificate to proof that we have been living good lives according to the teachings of the Church. If our performance has not been so well, if we feel that we have not live as good Catholics, we may feel a bit embarrassed about this certificate.

I’m sorry to disappoint you because the values of God are not the same as the values of the world. Jesus reminds us of this in today’s gospel. In answer to Pilate’s question about whether he is the king of the Jews, Jesus replies: “Mine is not a kingdom of this world.” But Jesus is king, though of a different kind. He says: “Yes, I am a king, I was born for this, I came into the world for this: to bear witness to the truth; and all who are on the side of truth listen to my voice.”

Just say that if we were to receive a certificate from Jesus, what would be points that would really matter to him and God. Well, the certificate would not be a record of our successes – how well we have done this or that. What matters is not success but faithfulness – have we been faithful to God? Have we been faithful to Jesus’ call to be his disciples? Have we been faithful to all that Jesus has taught us?

Secondly, the certificate would not be concerned with our status or position. Power and status have no place in the kingdom of God. It is only service that matters. Jesus is King but not a king who lords it over others. He is a Servant king. Have we served our brothers and sisters, especially those who are weak and the poor? Have we given them our time and our assistance without expecting anything in return?

Thirdly, the certificate would not record the number of times we pray or attend masses or formations. These things are important. But more important than these is the conversion that must take place within our lives. As we look back this entire year, do we see changes within ourselves? Have we become more committed Christians? Have we been able to overcome some area of sin which we were struggling with before this?

Today, as we celebrate this Feast of Christ the King, let us echo the words found in today’s second reading taken from the book of the Apocalypse: “Jesus Christ is the faithful witness, the First-Born from the dead, the Ruler of the kings of the earth. He loves us and has washed away our sins with his blood, and made us a line of kings, priests to serve God and Father; to him, then, be glory and power for ever and ever.” Let us be witnesses of Christ the King by allowing him to be king and lord of our lives.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Reverend Know it All on the Kind of Priests we want

Dear Rev. Know-It-All,

Is there an Encyclical or a Papal Teaching on how the lay person is required to respect their priests? We have someone in our lay community, who does not like the way her pastor gives homilies and is constantly criticizing him. We know this is wrong, but we don't know how to correct her without hurting her. Especially now, in the Year of the Priest, I would think there would be something from Rome.

Please help.

Clara Qalysm

Answer

Dear Clara,

First, the simple answer to your question: Yes. There is something recently written, Pope Benedict’s letter of June 16 inaugurating the Year of the Priest. That said, I am delighted to hear that some one is upset by the sermons in your parish. Hopefully, she is upset for the right reasons.

Somehow we have gotten the impression, (I think it started somewhere in the 1950's) that we are supposed to like priests. What an odd assumption. If a priest is doing his job, he should make us feel at least a little nervous, if not downright uncomfortable. We assume that Mass should be entertaining and that sermons should be enjoyable. The job of the priest is not to entertain. It is to do what Jesus did. Certainly you don’t believe that Jesus was crucified because He was such a nice fellow. It seems they didn’t have to look far to find a mob that was willing to shout “Crucify Him!” He must have irritated a few people. The job of the priest is to continue the work that Jesus did. Certainly, preaching and teaching were part of it, but so were healing the sick and casting out demons. However, Jesus’ ultimate work was to offer Himself as a sacrifice in reparation for the sins of the world.


When I was a young priest many years ago, I was given a new assignment as an assistant pastor. Shortly before I arrived to take up my new duties, St. John Vianney, the patron saint of parish priests, came to me in a dream and told me that I would have to pray a lot in this new assignment.

When I arrived at my new rectory, I noticed a beautiful wood carving of St John on the mantelpiece in the front room.

A few weeks later, I noticed that the statue of St. John was gone, and in his place was a mechanical monkey.

It seems the pastor had taken his vacation in Las Vegas, where he had won the little wind up monkey in a game of chance. When he needed a refill at the bar, he just switched on the monkey who banged a little pair of cymbals and the bar maid would fill his glass, and he would switch the monkey off, until pressed into service once again.

Thus, it was that the patron saint of priests was replaced with a mechanical monkey.

In the 20th century, we became accustomed to the priest as headman of the immigrant community. That changed into a kind of social director which has developed in our times to “pious bureaucrat.” The priest goes to meetings, conducts programs, fills out forms, visits the school, and glad hands everybody in the vestibule. He does weddings for young couples who have been living in sin for the past two years, then goes to the banquet where he gives the blessings at the beginning and end, thus giving the whole thing a veneer of sanctity. He conducts funerals, reassuring us that perhaps there is life after death and, doubtless, God, who is merciful, will overlook Uncle Mortimer’s gun running business and countless adulteries. After all, Old Mort had a kind heart.

A priest should be good with young and old, but not too good with young. He should be kind and pastoral and never critical he should preach a nice, though brief, sermon. He should go to all the events, the wakes the weddings, the men’s club, the women’s club, the youth group, and having done all that he should be a man of prayer, or at least appear to be. He must have the wisdom of age and the energy of youth, and be ready to rush to the hospital in the middle of the night to give the “last sacraments” to some reprobate who has not darkened the door of the church since his First (and last) Communion.

Above all, the priest makes sure that the fund raising is on schedule and the buildings are in good repair. Keep banging the cymbals, Father. At least keeping up the buildings has something to do with the ministry of Jesus. He was, after all, in the building trades for about 18 years.

In his letter of June 16th, on the year of the priest, it doesn’t seem that the Holy Father is urging people to celebrate the priesthood as much as he is urging priest to remember their calling. The letter is mostly a meditation on the life of my old friend, St. John Vianney. He was the Curé (the Pastor) of Ars, a small town in the south of France. After the French Revolution, the faith in France was in terrible shape, almost as bad as it is now. St John was to this little village of perhaps 250 souls, few of whom practiced their faith. He was not well received. In fact, they hated him.

For years, a group of women offered a special Mass intention. After a while, Fr. Vianney asked what they were praying for. They told him, “For a new pastor.” He went right on praying for their special intention. When he arrived in the parish, he prayed “Lord, grant me the conversion of my parish; I am willing to suffer whatever you wish, for my entire life!” He then went around for a month meeting his parishioners, getting to know the life of his little village, then he went to the pulpit and denounced their sins, especially their dances, which were nothing more than seduction.

As the pastor of Ars, Father Vianney realized that the Revolution's aftermath resulted in religious ignorance, due to many years of the destruction of the Catholic Church in France. At the time, Sundays in rural areas were spent in the fields working, or spent dancing and drinking in taverns. In modern America we work, run errands, go to sporting events and watch soft core pornography on our televisions. Vianney reminded his parishioners that Sundays were meant for the worship of God. Father Vianney began by giving sermons referring to the tavern as "the devil's own shop, the market where souls are bartered, where the harmony of families are broken up, where quarrels start and murders are done." No wonder they hated him.

I wonder what he would have to say about the way people come dressed when they bother to come to church at all. I bet he would have a few thing to say about video games and television programming as well. We live in an age when the Catholic Church is being systematically attacked from without and within. The ignorance of children regarding the faith and the sacraments is appalling. The torrent of pornography to which children are exposed is unfathomable, and that’s just prime time TV.

Our entertainments have corroded our sense of right and wrong just as they did in Ars 150 years ago. I am genuinely shocked when young people come to arrange a marriage and they are not living together. No one thinks twice about what in a former time would be called adultery or perversion, in fact it is celebrated. Parents are at a loss, unable and sometimes unwilling to do anything. God forbid the priest should fail to be in step with the times. We priests have been so in step that many of us have been swept away in the same river of filth and narcissism that is currently engulfing the world.

The problem then, as I see it, is not that someone in your parish is critical of the priest, but that only one person is critical of the priest. People want to love their priests because they are such nice fellows and give such nice homilies. This is a mistake. The priest is to be valued because he absolves sins and offers the sacrifice of Calvary, the only sacrifice which can make up for the barbarities of the age. In his own life, the priest is called to offer the sacrifice of the Mass as an expiation for his sins and the sins of his congregation, even if the congregation believes itself sinless, and worse still if the priest refuses to acknowledge his own weakness and sinfulness. The priest is supposed to be the one who leads his people to repentance, having himself wholeheartedly repented.

Allow me to quote from the Pope’s letter as he quotes St. John “The great misfortune for us parish priests – (St. John Vianney) lamented - is that our souls grow tepid"; meaning by this that a pastor can grow dangerously inured to the state of sin or of indifference in which so many of his flock are living. He himself kept a tight rein on his body, with vigils and fasts, lest it rebel against his priestly soul. Nor did he (St. John) avoid self-mortification for the good of the souls in his care and as a help to expiating the many sins he heard in confession. To a priestly confrere he explained: "I will tell you my recipe: I give sinners a small penance and the rest I do in their place". Aside from the actual penances which the Cure’ of Ars practiced, the core of his teaching remains valid for each of us: souls have been won at the price of Jesus' own blood, and a priest cannot devote himself to their salvation if he refuses to share personally in the "precious cost" of redemption.

We want to like the priest for the same reason we like the softball coach, the scout leader and Santa Claus. Again quoting St. John Vianney, the priest is to be valued for a quite different service, “Without the Sacrament of Holy Orders, we would not have the Lord. Who put Him there in that tabernacle? The priest. Who welcomed your soul at the beginning of your life? The priest. Who feeds your soul and gives it strength for its journey? The priest. Who will prepare it to appear before God, bathing it one last time in the blood of Jesus Christ? The priest, always the priest. And if this soul should happen to die [as a result of sin], who will raise it up, who will restore its calm and peace? Again, the priest. ... After God, the priest is everything! ... Only in heaven will he fully realize what he is. 'O, how great is the priest! ... If he realized what he is, he would die.' (St. John Mary Vianney)

If only a few more priests would take these words to heart and forget what their congregations thought of them.

Rev. Know-It-All

Sunday, November 15, 2009

Intercultural Awareness Workshop for NS Catechists - November 14

The Catechetical Ministry of the Church of Visitation organised a Workshop on Intercultural Awareness for the catechists and RCIA Facilitators of Negeri Sembilan District on Saturday, November 14. The trainer was Rev. Fr. Michael Chua, the Parish Priest of Visitation, Seremban and also the Ecclesiastical Assistant of the Archdiocesan Ministry of Ecumenical and Interreligious Ministry (AMEIA) which runs workshops and training of a similar nature.

The objective of the workshop was to create awareness among both catechists and RCIA Facilitators of the importance of intercultural knowledge in the area of communication and formation. Being leaders in the catechetical ministry, and entrusted with the responsibility of forming both children and adults into active members of the Church, there was a need for them to be equipped with the intercultural skills to build a community as diverse as the Catholic Church.

Being able to work and communicate with people from different backgrounds and cultures is essential in today's world and workplace. In the case of the Church, it is vital. Fr. Michael quoted the late Pope John Paul II in saying that "“The synthesis between culture and faith is not just a demand of future, but also of faith." The Catechists were introduced to the basic principles of multiculturalism in the context of Malaysia. Thereafter, they were led to reflect on the negative trend of stereotyping and the effects of ethnocentricity. Finally. the faith educators were exposed to various suggestions of teaching multiculturalism and diversity to their children and catechumens.
JPII

Saturday, November 14, 2009

Facebook, Wikipedia and YouTube in the Vatican

Preachers of Truth Meet Sellers of "My Own Truth"

By Jesús Colina


ROME, NOV. 13, 2009 (Zenit.org).- There are not a few voices in the Church calling for the message of the Gospel to make better use of the Internet -- Benedict XVI's is among them.

And yet, when representatives of some of the most successful Internet initiatives met in Rome today with the European bishops' Commission for the Media, a great difference in mentality became obvious, even if there was also evidence of a genuine desire for mutual understanding.

The chamber of the former hall of the synod of bishops -- which the producers of "Angels and Demons" rented for millions of euros -- witnessed two views of reality: On one hand, an institution, the Church, founded for 2,000 years on the proclamation of Truth; and on the other, exponents of successful business initiatives, which arose a few years ago, based on giving everyone the chance to express "his own truth."

The meeting occurred in the context of a four-day conference that began Thursday in the Vatican, promoted by the Commission for the Media of the Council of European Bishops' Conferences (CCEE).

Networking prelates


The meeting began with a survey among the bishops and representatives of the episcopal commission.

Moderator Jim McDonnell of the Signis World Catholic Association of Communication asked the bishops, priests and some lay experts in communication -- just under 100 in total -- how many had a profile on Facebook. More than one fourth raised their hand.

Nearly everyone in the group was familiar with Wikipedia and about 10% had collaborated in editing one of its entries.

Almost everyone had also viewed videos on YouTube and about 15% had used the site to post one of their own.

Approximately 10% had used or followed Twitter.

The networkers


Then came the presentations from the Internet representatives. Christophe Muller, director of YouTube alliances in Southern and Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Africa, illustrated the philosophy that gave origin and life to Google.

In particular, he praised the Holy See's decision to make a place for itself on YouTube. And he presented a promotional video showing how the great of the world -- from Barack Obama to the Queen of England -- use this platform. Among them is Benedict XVI.

Delphine Ménard, treasurer of Wikipedia, France, explained how the collaborative encyclopedia does not seek to give a view of truth, but rather aims for all points of view to be represented.

For his part, Christian Hernandez, in charge of the commercial development of Facebook, showed how Christian initiatives have arisen in the Facebook world that range from a Shrine of Lourdes profile, to "Jesus Daily," a profile that offers phrases from the Gospel, and has more than one million followers.

Among these initiatives, he also presented Benedict XVI's profile. What he did not say is that this profile was created by an unknown individual who has fraudulently taken the Pope's identity.

In a subsequent conversation with ZENIT, Hernandez said that today, this issue was brought to his attention at the Vatican.

He said that Facebook has blocked a Vatican profile page, but for the fraudulent Benedict XVI profile, he was unable to offer a solution.

Apples and oranges


As the meeting moved to the questions-and-answers stage, it was evident that there was clear difficulty in understanding.

On one hand, the prelates acknowledged the limits of the Catholic Church, which seeks to dialogue on the Internet, but by and large uses basic pages: About 70% of Catholic institutional sites have not introduced interactive elements of Web 2.0.

Then as well -- contrary to what they expected -- the bishops did not find themselves in a meeting with communication experts, but rather with representatives of enterprises with a very specific business model. This model is their primary interest and leaves aside humanistic considerations.

"Can one still speak of truth on social networks based on the idea that each user has his truth?" one of the prelates' working groups asked the Internet representatives.

The representatives of the three enterprises agreed that "power" has now gone to the users; users "control" the media -- but they will be able to seek truth more effectively knowing how to use the media.

Virtual Tour of Basilica of St. John Lateran - the Mother of all Churches

Ever wanted to visit the Basilica of St. John Lateran but just never could get to Rome?

Now you can, thanks to a breathtaking virtual tour created by Villanova University in Pennsylvania. The tour also includes the baptistry and cloister.

Click here to see for yourself.

As the cathedral of the bishop of Rome (the pope), containing the cathedra Romana (papal chair), St. John Lateran, dedicated by Pope Sylvester I in 324, ranks above all other Catholic churches in the world, even above St. Peter’s Basilica.

The tour has gone online just as representatives from Facebook, Google-YouTube and Wikimedia attend a Vatican conference on “The Culture of the Internet and the Communication of the Church.”

Held by the Pontifical Council for Social Communications, the three-day meeting will bring together media representatives from bishops’ conferences from all over Europe.

Speaking to Italian television, the council’s president, Archbishop Claudio Maria Celli, said the Internet “is an excellent means of communication” and that the Church is seeking “to be present where the people are, especially the youth.”

And although Pope Benedict XVI prefers to write by hand and send traditional letters, Archbishop Celli said he does use the Internet and e-mail.

“He sends his own personal e-mails — he does!” the archbishop said. “He doesn’t have a dedicated e-mail address,” he added, “but he very much appreciates the new technologies.”

All the messages to and from the Pope, the archbishop said, go through the Vatican.

Archbishop Celli said the Pope receives “very many” messages. “Of course, he cannot reply to all the millions he receives in his mailbox, but he certainly offers his prayers to those who write.”

Christmas Campaign for the Poor 2009: Give a Gift that Matters

We are all familiar with the old cliche - "Christmas is about giving." Some people spend ridiculously large sums of money to buy expensive gifts for each other.

This Christmas, our Parish invites you to a different way of giving. A giving that will make a difference in the lives of those who really need it, not those who have too much in excess. This Christmas, GIVE A GIFT THAT MATTERS!

The Christmas campaign for the poor, since 1968, has been responsible for mobilising parishioners from all walks of life to raise funds in order to reach out to the poor and needy. It has been made up of many dedicated individuals who have braved muddy and usually inaccessible roads to reach out to some of the poorest of the poor.

Visitation wants each of you to be part of this campaign this year. Reaching out to the poor is not a specialised job. Rather, it is the vocation of every Christian. Jesus invites you to lend a hand. Be involved in some way or other. Get involved in your BEC to raise funds, visit the poor, make a commitment to reach out to them throughout the year, get involve in our Flea Market (November 28 & 29), teach your youth and children to make sacrifices for the poor, support our team of fund-raisers by getting donors, etc.

There is always something to be done and someone needed for the job! Please contact Charles De Lima (IHD Chairman) at 012-6016981 or Mr. Jerome (PCC Chairman) at 012-3308071.




Friday, November 13, 2009

Announcements: November 14-15

Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009
22nd November 2009
Venue: Visitation Hall
Time: 1:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Compulsory for all BEC Core Team Members, Ministry Committee members. All other parishioners are invited to attend.
Registration after all masses this weekend



Christmas Campaign for the Poor 2009

The Christmas Campaign Committee is organising a flea market and food sale on 5th & 6th December 2009.
They are also appealing for contributions of useable items. They will be at the recreation corner on 29th November (Sunday) to collect these items.
Contact person: Jerome (012-3308071)


Migran/ Pendatang Refugi/ Umat dari Sabah-Sarawak
Kita berharap untuk memulihkan pelayanan kepada kumpulan ini. Sila segera berdaftar dengan En. Alfred (Tel No. 016-2129404) selepas Misa.


Misa dalam Bahasa Malaysia
akan dirayakan pada 29hb November (Ahad) jam 12 tengahari


RCIA: Day of Recollection in preparation for Catechumenate
Date: 21- 11-2009 (English)
Time: 1.20 pm to 5.00 pm
Place: Visitation Hall - upstairs
All Candidates and sponsors are to be present.

Please pray for the enquirers and sponsors for a fruitful recollection

Rite of Acceptance into the Order of Catechumens (English)
1st Sunday of Advent
English session on 28th November 2009 (Saturday sunset)
All Candidates and sponsors are to be present



Meeting of Extraordinary Ministers of Communion
Date: 15-11-09 (Sunday)
Time: 11.00 am
Venue: Visitation Hall - Downstairs



Clergy Monthly Recollection on 17th and 18th November 2009
There will be no morning mass on 18th November. Mass will be in the evening at 7.00 pm.
Please pray for our priests.


SDVP Calendars at RM10.00 and Christmas Cards at RM6.00 (pack of 8 assorted cards)are on sale now.
Kindly give your support.



Book Mission on 21st and 22nd November 2009
The Daughters of St. Paul will be having a display and sale of books after all Masses on the above dates. May this mission help to deepen our faith in God and cultivate the culture of reading among our Catholic faithful. Kindly patronise their stall.


"Exodus" Formation for Migrants and Refugees Collaborators
(especially for pastoral workers and collaborators involved in the care of migrants and refugees)

Date: Dec 3- 6
Venue: Majodi Centre, Johore
Closing Date: 22/11/2009
Please register with the Parish Office


District Altar Servers Camp
22nd to 24th November 2009
(3 Language Groups)
Venue: Catholic Centre
All Altar servers to register their attendance between 6 pm to 7 pm on Sunday, 22nd November at the Catholic Centre, Jalan Lee Sam.


Love & Life Seminar 2009

(7 day programme organized by ASAYO_
Date: 10 to 16th December, 2009
Venue: I.J. Convent, Cheras
Fee: RM150.00
Ages: 17-22 years old.
Closing Date – 20/11/2009
Forms are available at the Parish Office. For further details please refer to the Notice Board

Thursday, November 12, 2009

The Consequence of our Lives

Thirty Third Ordinary Sunday Year B

There are consequences to the way we live. Every action of ours has a consequence. Sometimes we see the consequences of our actions in our present life. For example, when we drink and smoke without restraint, we see these habits have an effect on our health. If we have not paid our attention to our studies when we were young we would most likely have to struggle on a low pay for the rest of our lives. When we steal and cheat, we would soon be exposing ourselves to the law.

But there are some consequences that we may not see in this life. Some people are able to live rich and comfortable lives in spite of their sinful lifestyle. Others seem to get away with the crimes they have committed without being caught by the police. Still many others go through life without thinking of God or placing him last on our list of priorities. But that doesn’t mean that our actions have no consequences. In fact, we are reminded by the readings today that it is to these actions that we must pay special attention. Ultimately we will be called to account for our every action or omission. If not now, then on Judgment Day.

The problem that we often face is this: because we don’t see the consequences of our negative actions in our present life, we may erroneously believe that there are no consequences. Many people live their lives with this misconception. Unless we wake up to the truth that we shall be accountable for our every action, we will die without the opportunity to mend our ways. All will be judged on the Last Day. All our actions, our mistakes, our good deeds, our sins, our failures, our successes would be made clear on that day. In spite of the mercy of God, no one can escape judgment.

The first reading from the prophet Daniel reminds us that “of those who lie sleeping in the dust of the earth many will awake, some to everlasting life, some to shame and everlasting disgrace. The learned will shine brightly as the vault of heaven, and those who have instructed many in virtue, as bright as stars for all eternity.” Let us hope and pray that on the Last Day we will rise to everlasting life and glory and be able to shine as bright stars in heaven for all eternity. But we are also reminded that unless we take our faith seriously, unless we begin to live up to our identity as Christians, another fate may await us – we may wake up to shame and everlasting disgrace.

We are approaching the end of the year. There is still time to amend our ways now. Don’t wait till tomorrow or next month or next year. As Jesus reminds us in the gospel today: “but as for that day or hour, nobody knows it, neither the angels of heaven, nor the Son; no one but the Father.” For some of us the Day of Judgment will come sooner than others. Be ready to give an account of your life when you are called to meet the Lord.

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Tamil Christian Song Competition 2009




The Tamil Apostolate of the Church of Visitation organised for the first time the Tamil Christian Song Competition at Visitation Hall, on November 8th. In line with this year's parish theme, "It is Good to be in Small Groups," the competition was organised on the basis of the Basic Ecclesial Communities (BEC). 23 BECS, including 21 Tamil speaking BECs and 2 bi-lingual BECs, participated in this competition.


The History of the Crucifix

In the light of the controversial decision by the European Court of Human Rights to ban crucifixes from schools in Italy, it would be opportune to reflect on the significance of the crucifix for Christians and Catholics.Below is a video from Catholic News Agency giving a brief history and explaining the significance of the crucifix.

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Announcements: November 7 - 8

Parish Pastoral Assembly 2009
22nd November 2009
Venue: Visitation Hall
Time: 1:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Compulsory for all BEC Core Team Members, Ministry Committee members. All other parishioners are invited to attend.
Registration after all masses this weekend



Christmas Campaign for the Poor 2009

A meeting will be held on 8 November (Sunday) at 11.00 am at Visitation Hall (Downstairs). All component members of the PIHD ministry, BEC Leaders and members of the previous Christmas Campaign Committee are to attend this meeting. Interested parishioners are strongly encouraged to attend as well. Let this make this a parish effort to reach out to the poor and share the good news of Christmas.


Infant Baptism on 8th November 2009
Instruction for parents/godparents will be on 7th November (Saturday) at 7.30 pm in the classroom (Formation Centre)


RCIA: Day of Recollection in preparation for Catechumenate
Date: 21- 11-2009 (English)
Time: 1.20 pm to 5.00 pm
Place: Visitation Hall - upstairs
All Candidates and sponsors are to be present.

Please pray for the enquirers and sponsors for a fruitful recollection

Rite of Acceptance into the Order of Catechumens (English)
1st Sunday of Advent
English session on 28th November 2009 (Saturday sunset)
All Candidates and sponsors are to be present



Meeting of Extraordinary Ministers of Communion
Date: 15-11-09 (Sunday)
Time: 11.00 am
Venue: Visitation Hall - Downstairs



Formation for Catechists & RCIA Facilitators (3 language groups)
"Intercultural Awareness"
Date: 14th November 2009 (Saturday)
Time: 8.30 am - 5.00 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall Downstairs



SDVP Calendars at RM10.00 and Christmas Cards at RM6.00 (pack of 8 assorted cards)are on sale now.
Kindly give your support.



Book Mission on 21st and 22nd November 2009
The Daughters of St. Paul will be having a display and sale of books after all Masses on the above dates. May this mission help to deepen our faith in God and cultivate the culture of reading among our Catholic faithful. Kindly patronise their stall.


"Exodus" Formation for Migrants and Refugees Collaborators
(especially for pastoral workers and collaborators involved in the care of migrants and refugees)

Date: Dec 3- 6
Venue: Majodi Centre, Johore
Closing Date: 22/11/2009
Please register with the Parish Office


District Altar Servers Camp
22nd (evening) to 24th (after lunch) November 2009
(3 Language Groups)
Venue: Catholic Centre
Compulsory for All Altar Servers
Please register with your respective leaders.



Love & Life Seminar 2009

(7 day programme organized by ASAYO_
Date: 10 to 16th December, 2009
Venue: I.J. Convent, Cheras
Fee: RM150.00
Ages: 17-22 years old.
Closing Date – 20/11/2009
Forms are available at the Parish Office. For further details please refer to the Notice Board