Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Love one another as I have loved you

Holy Thursday


“Love one another as I have loved you.” In these words, Jesus summarizes his whole message. Love was the reason why God send his only begotten Son to come among us and to die for us. Love was the reason why Jesus was prepared to be humiliated, be stripped naked and to be nailed on the cross. Love was the cause of the resurrection because there is nothing stronger than love, not even death could hold love back. And finally, it is through love that we would be recognized as disciples of Christ.

“Love one another as I have loved you.” This is the new commandment which Jesus gives to us. What is so new about this commandment? It is new because we no longer need to measure love based on how much we are capable of loving. Rather, we measure love based on how much we are loved by Jesus himself. We love inadequately. We love imperfectly. Only Jesus loved us totally as the Father had loved him and as he had loved the Father.

In today’s liturgy, we are reminded of this commandment. Jesus gives us the mass. At every mass, the priest repeats the words of Jesus: “Do this in memory of me.” “Do this in memory of me” does not only mean that we repeat the gestures of Jesus at our mass. “Do this in memory of me” means that we are to imitate the entire life of Jesus. We must love as he loved. We must forgive as he forgave. We must show compassion as he showed compassion. We must serve one another as he served his brothers and sisters. We must give up our lives as he did on the cross. “Do this in memory of me” becomes the expression of the new commandment “Love one another as I have loved you.”

Jesus will show us the extent of his love for us through his actions. We will soon witness how Jesus washes the feet of his disciples as the priest reenacts the scene of the Last Supper. Jesus would humble himself to take on the role of a slave to serve others. Every time when we celebrate the mass, we too are challenged to serve as he did. We too must put aside our pride and humble ourselves before others. We must not look for honour. We must not look for power. We must not seek to be great. We must not demand to be served by others. Instead, we are called to be a servant of one another.

Tomorrow Jesus will show a greater sign of his love. He will be nailed to the cross and die for us sinners. Every time when we celebrate the mass, we too are reminded of the sacrifice of the cross. We are challenged to put aside our selfishness and centredness. We are challenged to put aside all our masks, the masks that we wear in our homes, our schools, our offices and in church. We are challenged to die for one another – to give up our lives for love.

This is the standard of love which Jesus presents to us: “Love one another as I have loved you.” “Serve one another as I have served you.” “Die for one another as I have died for you.” If we come to understand and appreciate the true meaning of this commandment, then we will understand our mass better. The mass is not a set of empty rituals. The mass reenacts the sacrifice of Christ. The mass makes real the commandment of love. The mass challenges us to live out that same sacrifice and commandment to love one another as Jesus loves us.

The Paschal (Easter) Triduum


The Paschal Triduum, also called the Holy Triduum or Easter Triduum, begins the evening of Holy Thursday, and ends the evening of Easter Day. It commemorates the heart of our faith: the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Introduction

The Paschal Triduum, often called the Easter Triduum or simply the Triduum, begins during Holy Week, and consists of Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday. This includes the Great Easter Vigil, the high point of the Triduum. The word Triduum comes from the Latin word meaning "three days." It begins the evening of Maundy Thursday and ends at Evening Prayer on Easter Sunday. Thus the Triduum consists of three full days which begin and end in the evening. The Triduum technically is not part of Lent (at least liturgically), but Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday are still reckoned as part of the traditional forty day Lenten fast. The Triduum celebrates the heart of our faith, salvation, and redemption: the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Thus, the Triduum commemorates the Institution of the Eucharist (the "sacrament of sacraments"), the passion, crucifixion, death of the Lord, his descent to the dead, and finally his glorious resurrection on Easter Sunday morning. Along with the Ascension, these important events make up the Paschal Mystery.

Thus, even though the liturgical year begins chronologically at Advent, it reaches its culmination during the Easter Triduum, particularly at Easter, the "solemnity of solemnities," the "Great Feast." The Catholic Catechism describes the importance of the Triduum:

"Beginning with the Easter Triduum as its source of light, the new age of the Resurrection fills the whole liturgical year with its brilliance. Gradually, on either side of this source, the year is transfigured by the liturgy. It really is a "year of the Lord's favor." The economy of salvation is at work within the framework of time, but since its fulfillment in the Passover of Jesus and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, the culmination of history is anticipated "as a foretaste," and the kingdom of God enters into our time" (1168).

History

Christians have been commemorating the death and resurrection of Jesus since Apostolic times, because his death and resurrection are at the heart of Christian salvation. At least by the second century, Christians celebrated the Great Easter Vigil, an event which began the night of Holy Saturday, continuing until dawn on Easter morning. During this vigil, Christians commemorated salvation history, awaited the return of Jesus, and celebrated the resurrection of Jesus at dawn on Easter Sunday. It was at the vigil that catechumens, after a three year period of catechesis, were baptized and received first communion. The Easter Vigil was the most important day of the liturgical year. Eventually Christians expanded this celebration to a three-day commemoration of Jesus' passion, death, and resurrection, with the Easter Vigil being the high point of the three day commemoration. Nonetheless, over time, as the liturgical year expanded, the Easter Vigil lost its preeminence, although the three days celebrating the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus still held an important place in the Church Year.

Since the liturgical reforms of the Second Vatican Council, the Easter Vigil, and the Triduum, have regained their position of prominence in the Western Catholic liturgical calendar. The General Norms for the Liturgical Year and the Calendar re-established the Triduum as a season following Lent in the Catholic Church

Frequently Asked Questions


1. Since the Triduum is Separate from Lent, is Lent No Longer 40 Days? Does Lent Really End on Holy Thursday?
Technically, according to current Catholic discipline, Lent lasts 44 days, from Ash Wednesday through the morning of Holy Thursday (including Sundays), until the Triduum begins on Holy Thursday evening. Nonetheless, the traditional Lenten fast runs from Ash Wednesday through Holy Saturday, and does not include Sundays, since it is not appropriate to fast on a Sunday, the weekly feast of the resurrection. This fast lasts 40 days.

Nonetheless, this has created some liturgical questions. The addition of the Triduum as a separate season from Lent has obscured the direct connection of Lent to the 40 day fast of Jesus. The question of when Lent ends liturgically is still somewhat confusing, since at the liturgy of the Easter Vigil, during the renewal of Baptismal vows, the priest says: "Now that we have completed our Lenten observance, let us renew the promises we made in baptism..." Many feel that the Holy See will need to clarify the relationship between Lent and the Triduum at some point in the future.

2. So, the Triduum is the Most Important Part of the Church Year? Isn't Christmas More Important?
Christmas, the solemnity celebrating the birth and Incarnation of Jesus, is very important. Christmas and the Triduum are not in competition with one another, and are all a part of the same mystery of Christ's life, death, and resurrection. In fact, Christmas and Jesus' Conception constitute the mysteries of the Incarnation, essential to our salvation. However, in the early Church, Easter was considered the queen of all Christian feasts, the high point of the liturgical year. In fact, Easter seems to be an older feast than Christmas. This does not lessen the importance of Christmas, but the restoration of the Triduum to preeminence is actually a return to the more ancient practice of the Church.

3. Why Does the Church Celebrate the Triduum on a Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday?
It is long-held Tradition, based on the Biblical texts, that Jesus died on a Friday and rose from the dead on a Sunday, which would place the Last Supper on a Thursday night. Scripture tells us that Jesus rose from the dead "early on the first day of the week" (Mark 16:2, RSV). It was on the same day (the first day of the week) that Jesus met his apostles on the road to Emmaus (Luke 24:1). John also confirms that Jesus rose on a Sunday (John 20:1). The early Church Fathers universally held that Jesus rose from the dead on a Sunday, and worshiped on Sunday, "The Lord's Day." The Fathers also testify to the Institution of the Eucharist on a Thursday and a Friday crucifixion of Jesus. Even though Jesus tells us that he was to be in the heart of the earth for three days and three nights, in ancient Jewish reckoning, this included partial days. Thus, Jesus was saying that his time in the earth would span three days (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday). Saint Justin Martyr (writing in 150 AD) testifies to both Sunday worship and a Friday crucifixion of Jesus.

The Didache (70-90 AD) also mentions Sunday worship, and fasting on Fridays (likely connected to Jesus' crucifixion that day.

The Apostolic Constitutions (late 4th century) verifies the same chronology. Note that, based on Scripture, this document provides the rationale for the dates of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday.

Virtually every Church Father who addresses the issue agrees with the traditional dating of a Thursday Last Supper, Friday Crucifixion, and Sunday resurrection. This includes those Church Fathers and writings mentioned above, but also Ignatius (105 AD), Pseudo-Barnabas (120 AD), Clement of Alexandria (195 AD), and many others. This chronology is firmly based on Scripture, and universally verified by Tradition.

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Lectio Divina Meditation for Easter Sunday

Easter Sunday
April 4
The Empty Tomb


1. Lectio
Jn 20:1-9
1 It was very early on the first day of the week and still dark, when Mary of Magdala came to the tomb. She saw that the stone had been moved away from the tomb 2 and came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved. 'They have taken the Lord out of the tomb,' she said, 'and we don't know where they have put him.'
3 So Peter set out with the other disciple to go to the tomb. 4 They ran together, but the other disciple, running faster than Peter, reached the tomb first; 5 he bent down and saw the linen cloths lying on the ground, but did not go in.
6 Simon Peter, following him, also came up, went into the tomb, saw the linen cloths lying on the ground 7 and also the cloth that had been over his head; this was not with the linen cloths but rolled up in a place by itself.
8 Then the other disciple who had reached the tomb first also went in; he saw and he believed.
9 Till this moment they had still not understood the scripture, that he must rise from the dead.

Lectio Comments
“To see is to believe”, places considerable trust in our sense of sight as the guarantor of truth. But today’s gospel reading reminds us that Truth is beyond the grasp of senses. We are invited to see with the eyes of faith. Our physical eyes can only see what is there and what is not there. But the eyes of faith help us to see God even when we do not feel his presence. Faith helps us to recognise that God is present and continues working in our moments of pain, emptiness, loneliness, failure, and disappointment. Our physical eyes can only see an empty tomb on Easter morning. But our eyes of faith sees the risen Christ present in our homes, our families, our BECs, our parish, our society and the world.

2. Meditatio
1. Taking the position of Peter in the above story, what are some of the occasions where I feel that God is absent or far away from me? Why couldn’t I recognise His presence? Was it because I was blinded by my pain, selfishness, sinfulness or laziness to pray?
2. Taking the position of the beloved disciple, and asking the help of the Holy Spirit to make us ‘see’, try now to recognise the presence of God and Jesus in those same occasions where I felt that he was absent and far away from me. Use your imagination to try and see Jesus present on those occasions. Listen to what he is saying to you.

3. Oratio
God our Father,
by raising Christ your Son
you conquered the power of death
and opened for us the way to eternal life.
Let our celebration today
raise us up and renew our lives
by the Spirit that is within us.
Help us to rely not on our physical sight and senses
But on faith.
Help us to recognise your risen presence in our daily lives
Especially in moments of pain, loneliness and despair.
Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God for ever and ever.
Amen

4. Contemplatio
Picture the empty tomb and use this mantra, if its helpful, “He has risen from the dead!”.

5. Actio
1. Personal Life –Participate in Easter Triduum and pay special attention to the liturgy.
2. Communal Life – Write an Easter Card to a member of your family, BEC or neighbourhood.

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Palm Sunday


Palm Sunday is the sixth and last Sunday of Lent and the beginning of Holy Week, the most sacred season in the Christian calendar.

On Palm Sunday Christians celebrate the Triumphal Entry of Jesus Christ into Jerusalem, the week before his death and resurrection. The name is derived from the palm branches that are blessed at the beginning of Mass before the entrance procession. The Bible reveals that when Jesus entered Jerusalem, the crowds greeted him with waving palm branches, and by covering his path with palm branches. Immediately following this great time of celebration in the ministry of Jesus, he begins his journey to the cross.

Palm Sunday is also called Passion Sunday, because it also day when the Passion Reading which gives an account of Jesus' arrest, trial, suffering, crucifixion, death burial.

Thus, the gospel reading at the beginning of the Mass as the Palms are blessed is juxtaposed with the gospel reading of Jesus' passion with the desired effect to show a contrast between two very different life situations. It highlights the two paths or roads laid before Jesus, the road which leads to glory among men and the road which leads to the glory of the Cross, where Jesus is glorified by God. Ultimately Jesus chooses the latter.

More photos on Facebook.

Summary of Pope's Message for World Youth Day 2010 (Palm Sunday)

Theme: "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" (Mark 10:17)
Extracts from the Message are given below (prepared by the KL Archdiocesan Single Adults and Youth Office):

"The present 25th Youth Day represents a stage on the journey towards the next World Youth Day, which will take place in August 2011 in Madrid, Spain, where I hope many of you will come to experience that event of grace.

"To prepare ourselves for this celebration, I would like to suggest some reflections on this year's theme: "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?", taken from the Gospel account of Jesus' meeting with the rich young man, a topic already considered in 1985 by Pope John Paul II in a most beautiful Letter, addressed to young people for the first time".

1. Jesus Meets a Young Man
"The Gospel narrative effectively expresses Jesus' great concern for young people. ... His desire is to meet with you personally and establish a dialogue with each one of you".

2. Jesus Looked at Him and Loved Him
"In the evangelical narrative, St. Mark stresses how 'Jesus looking at him, loved him'. The Lord's gaze was at the core of that very special encounter, and of all Christian experience. In fact, Christianity is not primarily an ethic, but an experience of Jesus Christ Who loves us personally, young and old, poor and rich; He loves us even when we turn our backs on Him".

"The awareness that ... Christ loves everyone and always ... enables us to overcome any trial: ... sins, suffering or discouragement. In this love lies the source of all Christian life and the fundamental reason for evangelisation; for if we have truly found Jesus, we cannot but bear witness to Him to those people who have not yet encountered His gaze".

3. Discovering a Plan for Life
"The rich young man asks Jesus: 'What must I do?' The stage of life you are currently experiencing is a time of discovery: discovery of the gifts that God has lavished on you, and of your responsibilities. It is, moreover, a time of fundamental choices to create a plan for your lives. It is a moment, therefore, to question yourselves about the authentic meaning of existence and to ask: 'Am I satisfied with my life? Is there something lacking?'"

"Do not be afraid to address these questions! ... They await answers, answers that are not superficial but able to satisfy your authentic expectations of life and happiness. To discover the life plan that can make you fully happy, listen to God, Who has a plan of love for each one of you.

4. Come and follow me!

"The Christian vocation springs from a proposal of love from the Lord, and can only be fulfilled through a response of love. ... Dear friends, following the example of so many disciples of Christ, joyfully accept His invitation to follow, in order to live intensely and fruitfully in this world.

"The sadness of the rich young man of the Gospel is that which arises in the heart when a person does not have the courage to follow Christ, to make the right choice. However, it is never too late to respond to Him!

"In this Year for Priests, I would like to exhort boys and young men to be attentive as to whether the Lord is inviting them to a greater gift ... in ordained ministry, and generously and enthusiastically to make themselves ready to accept this sign of special predilection, undertaking with a priest or spiritual director the necessary path of discernment. Do not be afraid, dear young people, if the Lord calls you to the religious, monastic or missionary life, or to a life of special consecration: He is able to give profound joy to those who respond with courage.

"Moreover, I invite all those who feel the vocation to marriage to accept it with faith, committing themselves to laying solid foundations for a love that is great, faithful and open to the gift of life, which is a source of richness and grace for society and the Church".

5. Oriented to Eternal Life
"To ask ourselves about the definitive future awaiting each of us gives full meaning to existence, because it orients our life plan toward horizons that are not limited or fleeting, but broad and profound; horizons which lead us to love the world so loved by God himself, to dedicate ourselves to its development, but always with the freedom and joy born of faith and hope. These horizons help us not to make absolute values of earthly realities, aware that God is opening greater prospects for us. ... Dear young people, I exhort you not to forget this perspective in your own lives: We are called to eternity".

6. The Commandments, the Way of Authentic Love
"Jesus also asks you if you know the commandments, if you are concerned to form your conscience according to divine law and if you will put it into practice. These are certainly questions that go against the tide of the present-day mentality, which presents freedom as disconnected from values, rules and objective norms, and invites us to reject any limitation to momentary desires".

"God gave us the commandments because He wants to educate us to true freedom, because He wants to build with us a Kingdom of love, justice and peace. To listen to them and to put them into practice does not mean to be alienated, but to find the path of authentic freedom and love, because the commandments do not limit happiness, but show how to find it".

7. We Have Need of You

"Young people today find themselves facing many problems arising from unemployment, and from the lack of solid ideals, and of concrete prospects for the future. ... Despite the difficulties, do not let yourselves be discouraged and do not give up your dreams! Rather, cultivate great desires of fraternity, justice and peace in your hearts. The future is in the hands of people who know how to seek and discover powerful reasons for life and hope"

"In my recent Encyclical 'Caritas in Veritate' on integral human development, I listed some of the great modern challenges, which are urgent and essential for the life of this world: the use of the resources of the earth, respect for ecology, the just division of wealth, the control of financial mechanisms, solidarity with poor countries, ... the struggle against hunger in the world, the promotion of the dignity of human work, service to the culture of life, the building of peace between peoples, inter-religious dialogue, and the correct use of the social communications media.

"These are challenges to which you are called to respond in order to build a more just and fraternal world; challenges that call for an exacting and passionate life plan, into which to pour all your richness according to the design that God has for each one of you".

"In this Year for Priests, I invite you to study the lives of the saints, especially those of saintly priests. You will see that God guided them and that they found their path day after day, in faith, hope and love. Christ calls each of you to commit yourselves, with Him, and to assume your responsibilities to build a civilisation of love".

From the Vatican, Feb. 22, 2010
BENEDICTUS PP. XVI

RCIA Retreat 2010


The Elect, candidates for the Sacraments of Initiation, from the various language groups will be participating in various retreats this weekend. This is a special time of grace for the candidates as they make their final spiritual preparation for Holy Week and the Easter Triduum.

During the period of Purification and Enlightenment (Season of Lent) that immediately precedes the celebration of the Easter Mysteries, there is already a shift in the atmosphere from formal teaching to a time of inner quiet, reflection, and more spiritual growth. It is a time of ‘going into the desert’ and seeking the Lord, listening in one’s heart for his call, and learning to respond to him. Lent becomes a time for quieting the daily noise, a time of deeper reflection on the Scriptures, and a time to recognise how the candidates/elect are being led by the Spirit. The elect are challenged to reflect upon their own conversion journey – how they have already changed and where they are called to continual change.

This 2-day retreat (1 day for some of the language groups) is the climax of the entire ‘retreat’ experience of Lent. This intense retreat is a time away from the daily world and its distractions for the purpose of being with God and listening for His will.

The theme for Day I of the Retreat is built around the symbol of the cross. It is hope that meditations, prayer exercises and reflections will lead the candidates to commit themselves more firmly to the cross of Christ. For it is in the cross, that they will encounter the God who loves them and wishes to free them from slavery to darkness and sin. It is the cross, that Jesus promises us new life.



On the Day 2 of the Retreat, the Elect will be led to recall the steps of the journey that have brought them here and they take a further step into the unknown, ongoing journey of faith in resurrected life. This retreat is based on the unusually long Liturgy of the Word for the Easter Vigil. The nine readings of the Liturgy of the Word remind elect and sponsors alike that they are indeed pilgrims on the way, a people with a story that is ongoing.

As a parish community waiting to receive them as new members, as brothers and sisters in Christ on the night of the Easter Vigil, let us keep them in prayer during this weekend as they make this journey with and into the very mystery of God.



Friday, March 26, 2010

Holy Week Schedule

Palm Sunday
Saturday 27/3/2010
Novena 5.15 pm
Sunset Mass 5.45 pm

Sunday 28/3/2010
Tamil Mass 7.15 pm
English Mass 9.00 am
Mandarin Mass 10.45 am

Holy Thursday (1/4/2010)
Tamil Mass 5.45 pm
Mandarin Mass 7.15 pm
English Mass 9.00 pm
Silent Adoration 10 pm - 12 midnight

Good Friday (2/4/2010)
Way of the Cross 9.00 am
(3 languages)
Mandarin Service 2.30 pm
Tamil Service 4.30 pm
English Service 7.00 pm

Easter Vigil (3/4/2010)
Tamil Mass 6.00 pm
Mandarin Mass 8.30 pm
English Mass 10.30 pm

Easter Sunday (4/4/2010)
Tamil Mass 7.30 am
English/Mand 9.30 am
BM Mass 11.30 am

HE IS RISEN!!!

Announcements: March 27-28

Sunday School
Meetings for Parents of Pre-Confirmation Class (Form 4)
Date: 28-3-2010 (Sunday)
Time: 11.00 am
Venue: Visitation Hall (downstairs)
Compulsory Attendance for all parents concerned.

Catechism classes will resume on 28-3-2010

2009/2010 Pre-Confirmation Class (3 language groups) Fun Raising Bun Sale
1st April 2010 (Holy Thursday)
before and after all 3 masses.
Please give generously.



Formation
Parish Formation - "Year of the Priests"
Theme: "The Hour of the Laity: Understanding our common Priesthood in Christ"
Date: 10-4-2010 (Saturday)
Speaker: Dr. Sherman Kuek
Time: 9.00 am to 5.00 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall
Registration Fee: RM5/1 per pax. Please register with Doreen @ 017-3326007

ALPHA Course
(Planning Meeting)
Date: 16-4-10 (Friday)
Time: 7.30 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall (downstairs)
Calling all Alpha Facilitators and past participants who are interested in joining the new team for a meeting with Fr. Michael




Vocation Awareness Week
"Hearing the Call"
by Franciscan Capuchins
For all single adults (Male and Female) 18-35
Date: 11th - 17th April 2010
Venue: Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Cheras
Time: 6.30 pm - 10.00 pm (Non- stay in camp)
Contact: Vocation Office - 03-90745258 or Friar Andrew Manickam (012-4311020)
email: Andrew@sfa.org.my
for detailed programme, please refer to the Notice Board

SSVP Nation Youth Convention 2010
Theme: "Come and See:
Open to SSVP Members and Non-Members
Organised by SSVP for all Working Adults/ Youth (ages 23-39)
Dates: 25th - 27th June 2010
Time: 3.00 pm
Place: College General, Penang
Cost: RM 100.00 per pax
For more information, please visit their website: www.ssvp.org.my
Email: svpmsia@streamyx.com


Gotong Royong - Cleaning Church for Holy Week
Date: 28 March 2010 (Palm Sunday)
All BECs are invited to come forward to help out in the Gotong Royong project in preparation for Easter. Please bring along your own tools to work - brooms, dustpans, pails, rags etc.
Many hands make light work!

Lenten Campaign 2010
All families are invited to collect the Lenten Campaign envelopes from your respective BECs or take from the Bulletin boxes.
Kindly return all Lenten envelopes by 28 March 2010 (Palm Sunday).

Holy Land Collection
A special collection for Holy Land will be taken n Holy Thursday, 1-4-2010 at all the Masses.

Misa Paska dalam Bahasa Malaysia
akan dirayakan pada 4hb April (Ahad)
Jam 11:30 pagi
Perhimpunan/ Jamuan Paska untuk Migran
Tarikh: 4hb April 2010 (Ahad)
Masa 12:30 tengahari



Next Infant Baptism on 11 April 2010
Instruction for Godparents and parents on 10 April at 7.30 pm
Baptism forms are to be submitted by 7th April 2010.


SSVP (Conference of Visitation) - AGM
28th March 2010 (Sunday)
Time: 3 pm
Visitation Hall upstairs
All Are Welcome.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Bible Camp - Stds 4 - 6

By Juliana Cantius


The Bible camp for the children in Stds 4-6, was held on Tuesday the 16th of March 2010. The theme for the Camp was "PREFERENTIAL LOVE FOR THE POOR". Our Energetic team of Cathecist and Y2Y youths made it a Fun Event for the Kids. The Y2Y Team organized the Icebreakers & action songs for the children which was a Blast!!

The Camp Started with the Bible Enthronement. The first session on the Theme was conducted by Spencer & Amanda Sequerah, starting with a touching video presentation of a Short film called " Chicken Ala carte" that touched the children to think about the poor & hungry children and how to appreciate what they have.

After the a break, the children had fun with More Games and songs also Art work. Next was a Bible story, from the book of Luke 16 vs19-31 'The Rich Man & Lazarus' by Catechist Ann, Samantha, Amy, Angeline & Julie. This story taught the children that it is not a Sin to be Rich, but it is a sin to Turn Away and choose to ignore, those who are dying without - food, clothes, care or a home which are The Basic needs for every living being.

Finally when it was time for group dynamics, we were amazed, at how much the children had learnt from the Camp in sharing with us as groups with their written testimonies. After the Final Blessing by Father George, we dismissed the children.

A big Thank You to the Team That put this camp together:- Y2Y - Jamie, Cassy, John, Jaqueline, Melsilla & Audrey.

The Catechist :-Sr. Theresa, Elizabeth, Patricia, Magaret, Rosaline, Thresa, Amy, Amanda, Spencer, Samantha, Angeline & Juliana.
Also Father George & Eddy Joseph.
The Parents for their cooperation & the Children!!!!

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From Action to Passion

Palm Sunday

Many people measure their own worth and that of others by what they can do. If you are talented and able to do many things, you are considered a very special and worthy person. If you are not able to do many things, people often consider you as useless. We all value our autonomy and ability to do things on our own. Only young children and old people need to have things done for them. We feel extremely helpless and vulnerable when we are not able to do things for ourselves. That is why many people become very angry and frustrated and sometimes depress whenever they become sick. Others go through a crisis when they grow old, because they feel that they are not wanted anymore. Other elderly people also feel that they have loss control over their lives. When they were younger, they use to take care of the needs of their children. Many find it hard to accept that their children have now to take care of them.

In conclusion, we value action and activities over no action or a lack of it. We must always be doing something. If not, we feel useless and helpless. We feel totally unworthy. Today’s liturgy and the liturgy of this entire Holy Week gives us an entirely different picture. Jesus does not move from a set of activities to more activities. In fact, Jesus moves from being active to being passive. Jesus shows through the last week of his life that the value of life is not dependent on what we can do but rather on what God can do for us. When we are active and able to do things for ourselves, there is no room for God’s help. We don’t need God if we can solve our own problems. We don’t need God’s help if we can do things on our own. On the other hand, when we are helpless, financially, spirituality, emotionally, physically, we come to realize how much we need God in our lives. In fact, it is when we are powerless and helpless that we come to realize that life is meaningless without God.

Palm Sunday is also called Passion Sunday. Passion comes from the same root word for ‘passive.’ Jesus undergoes a change in his ministry. Before this week, we read of how Jesus performed miracles and taught the thousands that came to him. He was extremely active in his ministry. Somehow, he was not very successful in his active ministry. Many people came to him for miracles and healing. But very few actually decided to follow him. Even his closest friends and disciples will abandon him at the end of his life. His life of action will end in failure. But today, being the first day of Holy Week, a great change will take place. From active ministry, he is now going to become passive. He will be arrested, persecuted, nailed to the cross and finally left to die. He will become powerless and helpless. But it is in his powerlessness that he will accomplish our salvation. In other words, a life of failure will end in victory because God is victorious over sin and death.

When we look around us, we also see this same process happening – from being active to being passive. It is frightening process because no one likes to be helpless or powerless. No one likes to grow old and become useless. No one likes become sick and needing to be cared for. No one likes loosing their securities. But, we also realize that unless we move from the active to the passive, we will never allow God to be in control. If we continue attempting to control our lives and the lives of others, we will meet with failure. Victory and success is only guaranteed when we are prepared to let go and let God take control.

Let us enter Holy Week while keeping all of these in mind. Let us journey with Jesus from being active to being passive. Let us journey with Jesus as we slowly die to ourselves and to our false securities. Let us journey with Jesus to the cross and everlasting life thereafter.

Lectio Divina Meditation for Passion Sunday Year C

Palm Sunday
March 28
“The Road to Glory … The Way of the Cross”


1. Lectio
Luke 19:28-40
28 … (Jesus) went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem.
29 Now it happened that when he was near Bethphage and Bethany, close by the Mount of Olives as it is called, he sent two of the disciples, saying,
30 'Go to the village opposite, and as you enter it you will find a tethered colt that no one has ever yet ridden. Untie it and bring it here. 31 If anyone asks you, "Why are you untying it?" you are to say this, "The Master needs it." '
32 The messengers went off and found everything just as he had told them. 33 As they were untying the colt, its owners said, 'Why are you untying it?' 34 and they answered, 'The Master needs it.'
35 So they took the colt to Jesus and, throwing their cloaks on its back, they lifted Jesus on to it. 36 As he moved off, they spread their cloaks in the road, 37 and now, as he was approaching the downward slope of the Mount of Olives, the whole group of disciples joyfully began to praise God at the top of their voices for all the miracles they had seen.
38 They cried out: Blessed is he who is coming as King in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest heavens!
39 Some Pharisees in the crowd said to him, 'Master, reprove your disciples,' 40 but he answered, 'I tell you, if these keep silence, the stones will cry out.'

Comments
Holy Week begins with Palm or Passion Sunday. We find two differing scenarios, the first is found in gospel reading above which is read at the beginning of the procession into the Church and the second is found in the gospel reading of the passion during the Liturgy of the Word. The sharp contrast is highlighted by these 2 gospel readings. At the beginning of the week as Jesus enters Jerusalem, he is greeted by the crowds with excitement and enthusiasm for they believe that he would be the leader or the new king that would liberate them from the Roman conquerors. At the end of the week, the same crowd will shout and demand for his crucifixion because Jesus has disappointed them as his kingdom is unlike the kingdoms of the earth. Ultimately, we are reminded that the true road to glory for Christians must take the way of the cross. Without the cross, there can be no glory. It is better to be glorified by God than to be honoured by men.

2. Meditatio
1. Remember the times you received honour and praises from people. How did you feel? (Pause)
2. Now remember the times you were humiliated and embarrassed in front of others. How did you feel? (Pause)
3. Now, imagine that you are at a junction and there are two roads in front of you. The road on the left leads to human glory. Picture people standing and lining that road praising you, they are applauding and carrying banners with your name on it.
4. The road on the right leads to the cross. On this road, you would see people condemning, criticizing and accusing you. Which road will you take?

3. Oratio
Jesus Lord,
You have shown us that the glory of God
far outweighs the honour we receive from men.
May we always follow you on the road to the cross,
The cross which is our redemption,
The cross of humiliation,
The cross of your divine love,
And the cross of your glory.
Amen.

4. Contemplatio
Hold the image of the cross in your mind. Gaze at the cross with love.

5. Actio
1. Personal Life – Participate in the liturgy of Holy Week. Take time to reflect on the readings and rich symbolic actions which you will witness during the liturgy.
2. Communal Life – Pray for each member of your family during this Holy Week. Try to spend time together as a family, especially in attending the services of Holy Week.

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Solemnity of the Annunciation of Our Lord - March 25


The Annunciation is the Christian celebration of the announcement to Mary by the angel Gabriel that she would become the Theotokos (God-bearer). Even though a virgin, Mary would conceive a child who would be the Son of God. Gabriel told Mary to name her son Jesus (“Yahweh delivers”). Most of Christianity observes this event with the Feast of the Annunciation on 25 March.

The Feast of the Annunciation, March 25, is one of the most important in the Church calendar. It celebrates the actual Incarnation of Our Savior the Word made flesh in the womb of His mother, Mary.

The biblical account of the Annunciation is in the first chapter of the Gospel of Saint Luke, 26-56. Saint Luke describes the annunciation given by the angel Gabriel to Mary that she was to become the mother of the Incarnation of God.

Here is recorded the "angelic salutation" of Gabriel to Mary, 'Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee" (Ave, gratia plena, Dominus tecum - Lk 1:28), and Mary's response to God's will, "Let it be done to me according to thy word" (fiat mihi secundum verbum tuum) (v. 38)

This "angelic salutation" is the origin of the "Hail Mary" prayer of the Rosary and the Angelus (the second part of the prayer comes from the words of salutation of Elizabeth to Mary at the Visitation).

The Angelus, a devotion that daily commemmorates the Annunciation, consists of three Hail Marys separated by short versicles. It is said three times a day -- morning, noon and evening -- traditionally at the sound of a bell. The Angelus derives its name from the first word of the versicles, Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae (The Angel of the Lord declared unto Mary).

The Church's celebration of the Annunciation is believed to date to the early 5th century, possibly originating at about the time of the Council of Ephesus (c 431). Earlier names for the Feast were Festum Incarnationis, and Conceptio Christi, and in the Eastern Churches, the Annunciation is a feast of Christ, but in the Latin Church it is a feast of Mary. The Annunciation has always been celebrated on March 25, exactly nine months before Christmas Day.

Two other feasts honoring Our Lord's mother, the Assumption (August 15), and the Immaculate Conception (December 8), are celebrated as Holy Days of Obligation in the United States and many other countries (Malaysia only observes Assumption as a day of obligation). New Year's Day, January 1, is observed as a Solemnity of Mary. The Annunciation was a Holy Day throughout the Universal Church until the early 20th century. Many Catholics who are deeply concerned with the defense of the life of unborn children believe it would be fitting if the Feast of the Annunciation were restored to this status. Although it seems unlikely that it will be added to the Church calendar as a Holy Day of Obligation, we can certainly take on the "obligation" ourselves to attend Mass.

One sign of the significance this Christian feast had throughout Western culture is that New Year's Day was for centuries celebrated on March 25. It was believed by some ancient Christian writers that God created the world on March 25, and that the fall of Adam and the Crucifixion also took place March 25. The secular calendar was changed to begin the year on January 1 (in 1752 in England and colonies, somewhat earlier on the continent).

The Annunciation in Islam


Islam shares a similar tradition of honouring Mary as mother of Jesus (but not Mother of God). Apart from the similarities, there are also other significant differences in the narrative of Jesus' conception and birth, e.g. no mention of Joseph as the foster father,the place of birth etc. References to the Annunciation are found in two verses of the Quran:

Sura 3 (Al-i-Imran - The Family of Imran) verses 45-51:

45Behold! the angels said: "O Mary! Allah giveth thee glad tidings of a Word from him: his name will be Christ Jesus, the son of Mary, held in honour in this world and the Hereafter and of (the company of) those nearest to Allah: 46"He shall speak to the people in childhood and in maturity. And he shall be (of the company) of the righteous." 47She said: "O my Lord! How shall I have a son when no man hath touched me?" He said: "Even so: Allah createth what he willeth: When he hath decreed a plan, he but saith to it, 'Be,' and it is! 48"And Allah will teach him the Book and Wisdom, the Law and the Gospel, 49"And (appoint him) a messenger to the Children of Israel, (with this message): "'I have come to you, with a Sign from your Lord, in that I make for you out of clay, as it were, the figure of a bird, and breathe into it, and it becomes a bird by Allah's leave: And I heal those born blind, and the lepers, and I quicken the dead, by Allah's leave; and I declare to you what ye eat, and what ye store in your houses. Surely therein is a Sign for you if ye did believe; 50"'(I have come to you), to attest the Law which was before me. And to make lawful to you part of what was (Before) forbidden to you; I have come to you with a Sign from your Lord. So fear Allah, and obey me. 51"'It is Allah who is my lord and your lord; then worship him. This is a way that is straight.'"

And Sura 19 (Maryam - Mary) verses 16-26; both Suras without mentioning Jesus as the son of God:

16Relate in the Book (the story of) Mary, when she withdrew from her family to a place in the East. 17She placed a screen (to screen herself) from them; then we sent her our angel, and he appeared before her as a man in all respects. 18She said: "I seek refuge from thee to ((Allah)) Most Gracious: (come not near) if thou dost fear Allah." 19He said: "Nay, I am only a messenger from thy Lord, (to announce) to thee the gift of a holy son. 20She said: "How shall I have a son, seeing that no man has touched me, and I am not unchaste?" 21He said: "So (it will be): Thy Lord saith, 'that is easy for me: and (we wish) to appoint him as a sign unto men and a mercy from us':It is a matter (so) decreed." 22So she conceived him, and she retired with him to a remote place. 23And the pains of childbirth drove her to the trunk of a palm-tree: She cried (in her anguish): "Ah! would that I had died before this! would that I had been a thing forgotten and out of sight!" 24But (a voice) cried to her from beneath the (palm-tree): "Grieve not! for thy Lord hath provided a rivulet beneath thee; 25"And shake towards thyself the trunk of the palm-tree: It will let fall fresh ripe dates upon thee. 26 "So eat and drink and cool (thine) eye. And if thou dost see any man, say, 'I have vowed a fast to ((Allah)) most gracious, and this day will I enter into not talk with any human being'".

Chrism Mass 2010 - Church of St. John Marie Vianney


The Archdiocese of Kuala Lumpur celebrated Chrism Mass this year on March 24 at the Church of St. John Marie Vianney, Tampin. This small community played host to over 50 priests and bishops from the Archdiocese and from other countries who renewed their priestly commitment to serve God and His people. At this same celebration, the 3 holy oils were blessed and consecrated, namely the Oil of the Sick, the Oil of Catechumen, and Holy Chrism.

During his homily, Archbishop Murphy Pakiam spoke about the person, life, spirituality and ministry of St. John Marie Vianney, the Patron of Parish Priests and of the church in Tampin. "It is a spirituality and theology" said the Archbishop, "learnt at the feet of the Master and not from any Catechism book. It betrays a deep mystical theology which expresses profound communion with God and with his people."

More photos on Facebook.






Monday, March 22, 2010

Chrism Mass - March 24, 2010


The Mass of Chrism comes once a year. In our Archdiocese of Kuala Lumpur and in many other dioceses around the world, it is usually celebrated in the cathedral, the mother church of the diocese. However in recent years, the Chrism Mass in the Archdiocese of Kuala Lumpur has also been celebrated in various parishes to encourage greater participation from various sectors of the diocesan community. If you've never celebrated it, you're missing one of the most solemn and significant liturgies of our church.

This year's celebration will be in our district, the District (State) of Negeri Sembilan, in the Church of St. John M. Vianney, who is the patron saint of pastors and parish priests. The location has been chosen in conjunction with the Year of the Priest (2009-2010) and the fact that the Church of St. John Vianney in Tampin has been designated a pilgrimage centre.

At the Chrism Mass -- which is usually the largest annual gathering of clergy and faithful most dioceses have -- the priests renew the commitments they made at their ordination. The Mass takes its name from the most eminent of the three holy oils which the bishop commissions for his local church's use over the following year.

While the Oil of the Sick, used for those who seek the anointing, and the Oil of the Catechumens, which is imposed on those preparing for baptism, are simply "blessed," the Sacred Chrism is "consecrated," and all the priests present participate in the latter moment by extending their hands toward the vessel containing it as the bishop says the prayer of consecration.

The Chrism is used at the ordination of priests and bishops, baptisms, confirmations, the consecration of altars and the blessing of churches, where the walls are smeared with it in the shape of the sign of the cross.

As part of the consecration of the Chrism, balsam is poured into the oil, which gives it a sweet smell intended to remind those who encounter it of the "odor of sanctity" to which those people and things who are marked with it, and by extension all of us, are called to strive for.

Since the bishop is the only minister in the diocese who may consecrate chrism, this Mass highlights his ministry and our union with him. He will not baptize and confirm everyone in the parishes of the diocese, but he will be symbolically present in the chrism which the priests and deacons will use.

The Chrism Mass also provides an opportunity the faithful of the diocese to show support for their priests.

Sunday, March 21, 2010

Tamil Charismatic Rally - Leadership, Proclaimers of the Word, and Messengers


March 21 (Seremban) - As part of the Lenten preparation for the Tamil speaking community of the Church of Visitation, Seremban, the Tamil Charismatic Service Team of Visitation had invited the Kuala Lumpur Archdiocesan Tamil Charismatic Service Team to conduct this rally. Three talks were given on the themes of leadership, proclamation of the Word, and the mission of messengers.

Last Friday, March 19, the Tamil speaking community also listened to a talk on the significance of Lent given by Fr. Octavius, a priest from India.

Responsorial Psalm for Fifth Sunday of Lent Year C

Saturday, March 20, 2010

Bible Formation (English and Mandarin)


Today, March 20, parishioners from both the English speaking (136 participants) and Mandarin speaking (30 over participants) communities underwent a formation which introduced them on the basic principles of studying and praying the bible. Fr. Clement Lim from the Church of Immaculate Conception, PD spoke at the Mandarin session whereas, Fr. Michael Chua, the parish priest of Visitation delivered the English formation. Here are some basic tips which the participants had learned during the session:
  • Note Geographical, Historical and Cultural Background.
  • Know the Circumstances of Writing: Audience, Time, Place and Other Factors.
  • Interpret According to the Purpose of the Writer.
  • Recognise the Form of Literature.
  • Interpret According to the Grammar of the Passage.
  • Get at the Meaning of Single Words, But always study them in their setting.
  • Interpret a Passage in the Light of its Context.
  • Interpret any Passage in the Light of the Whole Bible Teaching & Analogy of Faith
  • Interpret it within the Church – the light of Tradition guided by Magisterium

More photos on Facebook.

Announcements - March 20 & 21

Sunday School
Meetings for Parents of Pre-Confirmation Class (Form 4)
Date: 28-3-2010 (Sunday)
Time: 11.00 am
Venue: Visitation Hall (downstairs)
Compulsory Attendance for all parents concerned.

No Sunday classes on 21-3-2010 due to School holidays
Catechism classes will resume on 28-3-2010

2009/2010 Pre-Confirmation Class (3 language groups) Fun Raising Bun Sale
1st April 2010 (Holy Thursday)
before and after all 3 masses.
Please give generously.



Formation
ACTM Formation on 25-3-10 (Thursday)
Time: 8.00 pm to 9.30 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall
All 3 language groups - BEC Coordinators, Ass Coordinators, Youth Reps, Messengers and Liturgy are required to attend.
ALPHA Course
Date: 16-4-10 (Friday)
Time: 7.30 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall (downstairs)
Calling all Alpha Facilitators and past participants who are interested in joining the new team for a meeting with Fr. Michael




Vocation Awareness Week
"Hearing the Call"
by Franciscan Capuchins
For all single adults (Male and Female) 18-35
Date: 11th - 17th April 2010
Venue: Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Cheras
Time: 6.30 pm - 10.00 pm (Non- stay in camp)
Contact: Vocation Office - 03-90745258 or Friar Andrew Manickam (012-4311020)
email: Andrew@sfa.org.my
for detailed programme, please refer to the Notice Board

SSVP Nation Youth Convention 2010
Theme: "Come and See:
Open to SSVP Members and Non-Members
Organised by SSVP for all Working Adults/ Youth (ages 23-39)
Dates: 25th - 27th June 2010
Time: 3.00 pm
Place: College General, Penang
Cost: RM 100.00 per pax
For more information, please visit their website: www.ssvp.org.my
Email: svpmsia@streamyx.com


Palm Sunday
Please bring along your own palms for blessing. Kindly gather at the grotto for the Blessing of the Palms followed by procession:
27.3.10 - Sunset Mass @ 5.45 pm
28.3.10 - Tamil Mass @ 7.15 am
English Mass @ 9.00 am
Mandarin Mass @10.45 am

Gotong Royong - Cleaning Church for Holy Week
Date: 28 March 2010 (Palm Sunday)
All BECs are invited to come forward to help out in the Gotong Royong project in preparation for Easter. Please bring along your own tools to work - brooms, dustpans, pails, rags etc.
Many hands make light work!

Lenten Campaign 2010
All families are invited to collect the Lenten Campaign envelopes from your respective BECs or take from the Bulletin boxes.
Kindly return all Lenten envelopes by 28 March 2010 (Palm Sunday).

Chrism Mass 24-3-10 (Church of St. John Marie Vianney, Tampin)
Time: 6.30 pm
For those who have registered for the bus, please be punctual in the Church of Vistiation at 3.45 pm for departure to Tampin.


Clergy Monthly Recollection
23rd and 24th March
The priest of the KL Archdiocese will be away for their Monthly Recollection on the above dates. There will be NO MASS on 24-3-10, Wednesday evening, as the priests will be attending the Chrism MAss at the Church of St. John Vianney, Tampin. All Mass intentions on that day will be offered up at the Chrism Mass.

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Lectio Divina Meditation for Fifth Sunday of Lent Year C

Fifth Sunday of Lent
March 21
“Mercy shown to sinners”

1. Lectio
John 8:1-11
1 Jesus went to the Mount of Olives. 2 At daybreak he appeared in the Temple again; and as all the people came to him, he sat down and began to teach them.
3 The scribes and Pharisees brought a woman along who had been caught committing adultery; and making her stand there in the middle 4 they said to Jesus, 'Master, this woman was caught in the very act of committing adultery, 5 and in the Law Moses has ordered us to stone women of this kind. What have you got to say?'
6 They asked him this as a test, looking for an accusation to use against him. But Jesus bent down and started writing on the ground with his finger.
7 As they persisted with their question, he straightened up and said, 'Let the one among you who is guiltless be the first to throw a stone at her.'
8 Then he bent down and continued writing on the ground.
9 When they heard this they went away one by one, beginning with the eldest, until the last one had gone and Jesus was left alone with the woman, who remained in the middle.
10 Jesus again straightened up and said, 'Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?' 11 'No one, sir,' she replied. 'Neither do I condemn you,' said Jesus. 'Go away, and from this moment sin no more.'

Comments
It is interesting to note that only the woman is caught and brought before Jesus for judgment but not the men who had committed adultery with her. Very often, our sense of justice is distorted. It is very easy for us to discover the faults of others but are unable to recognise our own. Perhaps, some of the men who had been guilty of committing adultery with this woman are standing there in the crowd, joining in the cry for justice and punishment. Jesus gives the great lesson of compassion. He teaches us that it is only when we come to recognise our own weaknesses and limitations can we then come to accept the weaknesses and limitations of others. Jesus teaches us to make an important distinction – to hate sin but to love the sinner.

2. Meditatio
1. Imagine yourself as that woman. Feel her shame and her remorse. Also imagine the love and forgiveness she must have felt from Jesus who chose not to condemn her. (Pause for 5 minutes)
2. Imagine yourself as one of the crowd. Remember the many times you have accused others of wrongdoing. Remember the many times you demanded for justice but had been motivated by your own self-righteousness. See Jesus looking straight at you and speaking these words, 'Let the one among you who is guiltless be the first to throw a stone.' (Pause for 5 minutes)

3. Oratio
Lord,
You have liberated us from slavery to sin
And have made us sons and daughters of God.
Teach us the new way of forgiveness
that you have shown to the woman caught in adultery,
help us to hate sin but to love the sinner.
May we always be conscious that we are sinners
So that we may not be blinded by our own self-righteousness.
Amen.

4. Contemplatio
Contemplate by using 2 themes – contemplate by reflecting on your own sinfulness in relation to God’s forgiving love.

5. Actio
1. Personal Life: Make a list a people whom we have judged harshly. Try to make a list of their strengths, qualities and values.
2. Communal Life: Make a commitment as a community to do some penance and make time to pray for souls in purgatory.

Sunday, March 14, 2010

Y2Y School Break Gathering


March 14 - The Y2Y Catechetical Youth started off the first school term holidays with a blast of a gathering. The gathering started with a session of praise and worship and prayer which was then followed by several of the youth sharing the significance of Lent in their own personal lives. This was followed with a series of games and group dynamics. The Y2Y holds a bi-monthly gathering for youth ranging from Forms 1 to 5.

Join the Y2Y Facebook group and get the latest updates and information on future activities.

2nd Rite of Scrutiny and Exorcism


March 14 - The Elect, candidates for the Sacrament of Initiation at the Easter Vigil, celebrated the 2nd Rite of Scrutiny and Exorcism at the various vernacular masses. The theme for the 4th Sunday of Lent is Illumination, with the gospel taken from Year A lectionary focusing on Jesus, the Light of the World, healing the man who was born blind. Next Sunday, the Fifth Sunday of Lent, which is also the final Sunday of Lent before Holy Week, the Elect will celebrate the third and final Rite of Scrutiny and Exorcism. This will be the last set of rites before the celebration of the Easter Mysteries at the Easter Vigil.

Videos of the Rite has been uploaded to The Welcoming Parish Youtube Channel.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Catholic Students Society (CSS- Visitation)


The Catholic Students Society of the Church of Visitation had its first AGM today, March 13. At the same meeting, new office bearers were elected and the members brainstormed activities and events for the year. The first activity planned will take place next weekend at the both the English masses. CSS will be introduced to the parishioners and other College youth through a slide-presentation followed by distribution of pamphlets at the entrances of the Church. In line with the liturgical season, the CSS members will also be distributing pamphlets explaining a simple way to perform fasting and other penances.

The CSS-Visitation is open to all College youth and Form 5 and Form 6 leavers. Join the CSS-Visitation Facebook group and learn about our upcoming activities. Come and join us!

Bible Formation (Tamil): How to Study the Bible?

In line with the Parish theme, "The Bible, A Guide for our Steps, A Light for the World", the Parish Pastoral Council and the priests have decided to provide a basic formation that introduces lay persons to the art of studying and praying the bible. The formation will be conducted in 3 languages, with the first formation in Tamil conducted this afternoon by Fr. George Packiasamy. Over 70 participants attended this afternoon's Tamil formation.

At last year's Parish Pastoral Assembly, the following focus for the year 2010 was affirmed:

Focus: To make the Bible, the Word of God the centre of our lives, and the basis of:
1. Community and Unity
2. Discipleship
3. Prayer
4. Service
5. Witnessing

Method:
a) ACTM focus on training and introducing leaders to Lectio Divina (Spiritual Reading).
b) To provide modules for Lectio Divina based on Lectionary Readings
c) Formations on Bible (including 100 Weeks Bible, 44 week Bible Course etc.)
d) Formations on Evangelisation/ Witnessing/ Discipleship/ Spirituality
e) Retreat on Lectio Divina
f) Catechetical Emphasis on Bible
g) Ensure that every family or member should have a bible (cheap Bibles or sponsored bibles to be made available to poorer families; audio CDs for those who are illiterate)

More photos on Facebook.


Announcements - March 13-14

Sunday School
Meetings for Parents of 1st Holy Communion Class (Standard 3)
Date: 14-3-2010 (Sunday)
Time: 11.00 am
Venue: Visitation Hall (downstairs)
Compulsory Attendance for all parents concerned.

Bible Camp for pupils
(Standards 4-6)
Date: 16-3-2010
Time: 8.30 am - 5.00 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall - downstairs
Please bring along the necessary stationery

No Sunday classes on 21-3-2010 due to School holidays
Catechism classes will resume on 28-3-2010


Formation: Introduction to Studying and Praying the Bible (English)
Date: 20th March (Saturday)
Time: 9 am to 1 pm
Venue: Visitation Hall, Downstairs
Speaker: Fr. Michael Chua
Registration fee: RM 3.00 per person
Open to all BEC and ministry members, Catechists, RCIA Facilitators, all parishioners.
Registration after all weekend masses (at Recreation Corner)
Contact: Jessie - 019-2524290/ 06-6789764
Doreen - 017-3326007

Tamil Section Formation: 13th March
Speaker: Fr. George Packiasamy
Mandarin Section Formation: 20th March
9.00 am to 1. pm
Speaker: Fr. Clement Lim
Contact: Edwin Moo 012-2059809
Violet Wong 016-6515273



Y2Y Gathering
Form 1 to Form 5 students (all are welcome)
Date: 14 - 3- 2010 (Sunday)
Place: Visitation Hall - downstairs.
This will be a special event with lots of fun, games and activities planned.
Refreshment will be provided.

Vocation Awareness Week
"Hearing the Call"
by Franciscan Capuchins
For all single adults (Male and Female) 18-35
Date: 11th - 17th April 2010
Venue: Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Cheras
Time: 6.30 pm - 10.00 pm (Non- stay in camp)
Contact: Vocation Office - 03-90745258 or Friar Andrew Manickam (012-4311020)
email: Andrew@sfa.org.my
for detailed programme, please refer to the Notice Board

SSVP Nation Youth Convention 2010
Theme: "Come and See:
Open to SSVP Members and Non-Members
Organised by SSVP for all Working Adults/ Youth (ages 23-39)
Dates: 25th - 27th June 2010
Time: 3.00 pm
Place: College General, Penang
Cost: RM 100.00 per pax
For more information, please visit their website: www.ssvp.org.my
Email: svpmsia@streamyx.com


Way of the Cross & Mass
The Devotion of Way of the Cross at Parish Level on Fridays during Lent will be at 1.00 pm followed by Mass.
All BECs are encouraged to have their own Way of the Cross every Friday evening during the Lenten Season.
Limited stock of "Stations of the Cross" booklets available for sale at RM5 each. Do get a copy for your own use.

Lenten Campaign 2010
All families are invited to collect the Lenten Campaign envelopes from your respective BECs or take from the Bulletin boxes.
Kindly return all Lenten envelopes by 28 March 2010 (Palm Sunday).

Chrism Mass 24-3-10 (Church of St. John Marie Vianney, Tampin)
Time: 6.30 pm
This year's celebration will be brought to our district in conjunction with the Year of the Priest. Bus transport at RM10.00 per person.
Those interested, please register with Doreen (017-3326007)

Confessions for the Home-bound, Elderly and Sick
The priests will be available to visit the home bound elderly and sick to hear confession/ anointing. Please submit your names, addresses and contact no to the Parish Office by 19 March 2010.


Liturgy Meeting
Date: 13-3-2010
Time: 7.30 pm
Venue: Parochial House - Conference Room